News & Events



HOME  orange arrow  News & Events

2-day R Workshop-Software Carpentry-CANCELLED

Posted by on 8:00 am in Events, News | Comments Off on 2-day R Workshop-Software Carpentry-CANCELLED

2-day R Workshop-Software Carpentry-CANCELLED

After careful consideration, the 2-day Software Carpentry-R Workshop previously scheduled for April 1-2, 2020, at the Richter Library is CANCELLED due to statewide precautions for the COVID-19 Coronavirus, and the State of Florida’s public health emergency declaration. The Institute for Data Science and Computing is committed to the health and welfare of our attendees, sponsors, and speakers, and the community as a whole, and have decided to err on the side of safety. We thank you for your interest in our program and ask you to stay tuned to our website for future dates. All registration and application links have been disabled. If you have questions or concerns, please call 305-243-4962. ___________________________________ This workshop is designed to provide a foundation of basic concepts that all programming depends on, using R as an example. Trained instructors lead a comprehensive, hands-on overview of what is possible with R, using an example dataset. Go from reading data into R to data types, functions, conditional statements, loops, how to write in RMarkdown, as well as best practices for writing R code that others can understand and use. Since the goal of this workshop is to bring you up to speed with data analysis, it would be incomplete without instruction on a shell as well as a version control system. The shell is important in building reproducible data analysis pipelines where your R scripts may be just one component, Git is an incredibly useful tool for version control, collaboration and management of your coding projects. This workshop will provide you with the basic computing skills and best practices needed to be productive in a small research team. The format is a mixture of short seminars and hands-on practical exercises, and participants are encouraged to help one another, and to try applying what they have learned to their own research problems during and between sessions. This free 2-day workshop is capped at 35 participants, and is on a first-come/first-served basis. Instructors:  Tim Norris, PhD, Research Data Scientist |   Cameron Riopelle, PhD, Data Services Librarian NOTE: Please bring a laptop (any OS) and charging cable. Wednesday and Thursday, April 1-2, 2020 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM Course Hours, Both Days Richter Library, Learning Commons Flexible Program Space (1st Floor),  Room #102-B, Gables Campus ____________________ SPONSORS     ...

read more

Mapping the Vernacular Symposium—POSTPONED

Posted by on 7:00 am in Events, News | Comments Off on Mapping the Vernacular Symposium—POSTPONED

Mapping the Vernacular Symposium—POSTPONED

After careful consideration, the Mapping the Vernacular Symposium previously scheduled for April 17, 2020, at the Watsco Center is POSTPONED due to statewide precautions for the COVID-19 Coronavirus, and the State of Florida’s public health emergency declaration. The Institute for Data Science and Computing is committed to the health and welfare of our attendees, sponsors, and speakers, and the community as a whole, and have decided to err on the side of safety. We thank you for your interest in our program and ask you to stay tuned to our website for future dates. All registration and application links have been disabled. If you have questions or concerns, please call 305-243-4962. ___________________________________ Mapping the Vernacular: CCS Symposium in new approaches for community driven sustainable development in urban informal environments. In collaboration with the UM School of Architecture, the University of Miami Center for Computational Science (CCS) will host a half-day symposium on the application of new technologies to facilitate community driven sustainable development in urban informal environments. Through a recent pilot project—located in the community of Las Flores, an informal settlement in Barranquilla Colombia, and the National Geographic Society, with additional support from Fundación Tecnoglass ESWindows, and CCS—the Symposium explores how new drone survey technologies can be used in conjunction with established participatory data gathering methods to rapidly gather and produce community prioritized information. The combined methodology encourages storytelling from both physical—the built and natural environment—and cultural perspectives in the communities. Products include digital 3D models, high-resolution scaled aerial imagery, maps, oral histories, a census style survey, a public participatory GIS system (P/PGIS), a novel urban design concept, and a model document for data sharing agreements and a data governance board. The project is based on the assumption that the cooperative collection, review and discussion of data combined with dissemination through stories and maps leads to opportunities for a more just and sustainable society. The Symposium was scheduled for Friday, April 17, 2020, from 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM at the Watsco Center H100 Room, 1245 Dauer Dr, Coral Gables, FL 33146. Light breakfast, lunch, and complimentary parking included.  Directions   Who Should Attend Anyone interested in sustainable development, urban design, drone survey technologies, photogrammetry, geographic information systems (GIS), and community engagement with mapping and data collection projects.     Background By 2050 the United Nations estimates that 66 percent of the world population will be urban, and a large part of this urban population will join, or create new, informal communities in conditions of poverty. Nearly one billion people within this urban population currently live in such communities which are generally undocumented, lack land tenure, are comprised of non-durable or overcrowded housing, and are beyond the reach of government services and infrastructure. Challenges faced by residents include; lack of personal security, insufficient public health measures, and limited access to potable water sources. Additionally, residents of informal communities also face increased exposure to environmental hazards resulting in a greater risk for adverse health effects, particularly in children, as well as being in locations that are “highly vulnerable to natural disasters and are expected to experience the greatest impact of climate change” (UN 2014). Addressing such unplanned urban expansion is a principle challenge for sustainable development for the foreseeable future. During an approximate ten-month period from October 2018 to July...

read more

PyData Miami 2-day Conference—POSTPONED

Posted by on 6:00 am in Events, News | Comments Off on PyData Miami 2-day Conference—POSTPONED

PyData Miami 2-day Conference—POSTPONED

The PyData Miami 2020 Conference has been POSTPONED due to statewide precautions for the COVID-19 Coronavirus, and the State of Florida’s public health emergency declaration. We thank you for your interest and ask you to stay tuned to our website for future dates. All registration and application links have been disabled. If you have questions or concerns, please call 305-243-4962. ___________________________________ #PyDataMiami2020 is a 2-day conference on tools and techniques for machine learning, data analysis, visualization, and large-scale data infrastructure. We are an accessible, community-driven conference with talks and tutorials for all skill levels: students, practitioners, and researchers. PyData focuses on open-source computational tools for the Python programming language (such as NumPy, Pandas, and scikit-learn), as well as implementation-agnostic techniques, and other high level numerical languages, such as R and Julia. ( @PyDataMiami)   Diversity Scholarships One of PyData's goals is to increase awareness and excitement around opportunities for underrepresented groups in software engineering and data analytics. To increase diversity in scientific computing, our outreach program ranges from hosting workshops that introduce programming to young women to encouraging diversity in speakers at PyData. For PyData Miami 2020, we are offering scholarship opportunities to those from underrepresented groups who may otherwise be unable to attend the conference. Please note scholarships do not cover travel and lodging costs. Click HERE to submit an application.   About PyData PyData provides a forum for the international community of users and developers of data analysis tools to share ideas and learn from each other. The global PyData network promotes discussion of best practices, new approaches, and emerging technologies for data management, processing, analytics, and visualization. PyData communities approach data science using many languages, including (but not limited to) Python, Julia, and R.  We aim to be an accessible, community-driven conference, with novice to advanced level presentations. PyData tutorials and talks bring attendees the latest project features along with cutting-edge use cases.   April 23-24, 2020 New dates forthcoming . . .     WATSCO CENTER University of Miami Coral Gables Campus Fieldhouse / Multipurpose Room 1245 Dauer Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 Map  &  Directions        ...

read more

2019-2020 CCS Fellows Final Presentations 4/30/2020

Posted by on 10:10 am in CCS Fellows, Events, News | Comments Off on 2019-2020 CCS Fellows Final Presentations 4/30/2020

2019-2020 CCS Fellows Final Presentations 4/30/2020

Please RSVP The vision of the CCS Fellows Program is to inspire a new generation of leaders in computational science to cross the traditional boundaries between disciplines, by equipping them with new cross-disciplinary skills and experience. The Program does this by offering mentorship outside the students’ area of expertise. “CCS Fellow” is a prestigious designation awarded to two undergraduate students and two graduate students per year.  Join us on Thursday, April 30, 2:00-4:00 PM, for the 2019-2020 CCS Fellows' final project presentations. This event is free and open to interested UM Faculty/Staff/Students.  Refreshments will be served. Location Newman Alumni Center, Executive Conference Room, 6200 San Amaro Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146   Map | Directions Meet the 2019-2020 CCS Fellows: Chitra Banarjee Project:  Movement and Social Approach in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Mentors: Gang Ren, PhD | CCS Big Data Analytics & Data Mining Daniel S. Messinger, PhD  |  Professor of Psychology Bio: Chitra is an undergraduate at UM studying Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Mathematics (Applied Analysis) with a minor in Chemistry. She's currently working under Dr. Daniel Messinger in the Interactive Behavior in Schools (IBIS) project to understand social movement and approach in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) through objective, continuous measurements. As a CCS fellow, she hopes to explore the potential of automated behavioral measurement for objectively describing the ASD phenotype through quantification of the social movement deficits characteristic of children with ASD in their interactions with their peers. Anthony Mario Bonacolta Project:  Single-cell Transcriptomic Sequencing of a Coral during the Bleaching Process Mentors: Ben Kirtman, PhD | Program Director, CCS Climate & Environmental Hazards and Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, RSMAS Javier del Campo, PhD  |  Assistant Professor, Department of Marine Biology and Ecology, RSMAS Bio: Anthony is a first year PhD student in Dr. Javier del Campo's Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Laboratory in the Marine Biology and Ecology Department at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. His research focuses on the role of micro-eukaryotes and bacteria in marine organisms. Jia Geng Project:  Developing Deep Learning Models for Rotifer (Bachionus spp.) Detection and Classification Mentors: Amin Sarafraz, PhD  |  CCS Software Engineering and Research Assistant Professor, College of Engineering Daniel Benetti, PhD  |  Director of Aquaculture and Professor, Department of Marine Ecosystems and Society Bio: Jia is currently a PhD student in Marine Ecosystem and Society under the supervision of Dr. Daniel Benetti. He received his BS in Aquaculture from the Ocean University of China in 2015 and Graduate Certification in Data Science Foundations from North Carolina State University in 2019. His doctoral research centers on developing AI systems to automated live feed cultivation for fish hatcheries. During the CCS Fellows program, he hopes to apply deep learning models to achieve high accuracy rotifer detection and classification. His project website can be reached via GitHub: gengjia0214/AIRoti. Karna Nagalla Project:  Computational Approaches to Microbiome Alterations and Disease States Mentors: Sylvia Daunert, PhD  Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Lucille P. Markey Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Director, Dr. JT Macdonald Biomedical Nanotechnology Institute Director of Research, Center for Integrative and Complementary Medicine Gregory O'Connor, PhD  |  Post Doctoral Associate, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Bio: Karna is an undergraduate at the University of Miami studying Microbiology/Immunology and Applied Math with a minor in Chemistry and Electrical Engineering. He...

read more

Notification: Storage System Maintenance Begins 1/4 at 7AM

Posted by on 1:44 pm in News - Archived | Comments Off on Notification: Storage System Maintenance Begins 1/4 at 7AM

Notification: Storage System Maintenance Begins 1/4 at 7AM

Start time: 14 January 2020 07:00am EST End time:  14 January 2020 11:59pm EST   /projects2 on the Pegasus cluster will be offline from 7AM to 11:59 PM EST, Tuesday, 01/14/2020. During this period, we will be working on the future expansion of our system. The rest of the system will be functioning as usual. Please plan accordingly. CCS HPC Team As always, if you have any questions or problems, please contact us by sending email to: hpc@ccs.miami.edu....

read more

Magic Leap Grants Awarded for Projects Ideas to Bolster Learning & Research

Posted by on 10:00 am in News | Comments Off on Magic Leap Grants Awarded for Projects Ideas to Bolster Learning & Research

Magic Leap Grants Awarded for Projects Ideas to Bolster Learning & Research

Three Magic Leap/mixed realty project ideas have been approved by the Magic Leap Leadership Council. The Office of the Provost has awarded the teams $10,000 each for projects that will harness Magic Leap technology to bolster learning or research. Beginning on January 1st, the proposed projects must be completed by April 30, 2020. The grant money may be used only to support students, purchase materials and supplies, and/or get technical support from mixed-reality software experts. Software support systems available to the project teams are (a) their own,  (b) Center for Computational Science, (c) IT Innovate, or (d) Gordon Center. Teams must present midpoint and final results at two Magic Leap events: (1) A grantee meeting at the beginning of March 2020 (2) A showcase event at the end of April, where teams will present their demos on Magic Leap headsets. These events will give the Magic Leap Leadership Council the opportunity to provide feedback to the Provost about the progress of the Magic Leap Initiative. Also, a series of Magic Leap workshops will be held in January-February 2020. Project team members attend at least one of these workshops. A total of 24 proposals were funded.  CCS is excited to be working in collaboration with these funded projects: "Mixed Reality Visualization of Aortic Aneurysm Diagnosis Results"  | Liang Liang collaboration with Amin Sarafraz "Peri-Operational Experience (POE)" | Lee Kaplan MD, Chief, UHealth Sports Medicine; Petra and Stephen Levin Endowed Chair in Sports Medicine, Medical Director and Head Team Physician for Miami Hurricanes and Miami Marlins "Tiling the Magicverse" | Tim Norris CCS/Richter Library; Amin Sarafraz and Chris Mader CCS Software Engineering; Kim Grinfeder, Associate Professor and Director, Interactive Media, School of Communication "Wish" Mixed reality performance of the composition for flute and piano | Jeffrey M. Buckman, Assistant Professor and Stage Director for Opera at the Frost School of Music "ARtXP: Experiencing Historic Architecture with Magic Leap" | Karen Mathews, PhD, Associate Professor of Art History, College of Arts & Sciences; Amin Sarafraz, PhD and Chris Mader CCS Software Engineering "South Florida Mixed Reality Field Trips" | Art Gleason, Physics; Amin Sarafraz, CCS; and Sam Purkis, PhD and Frederick  Hanselmann, PhD, RSMAS -MES “We are looking for clever ideas that will bring digital worlds from the arts, humanities, sciences, and medicine into our physical world and enhance discovery and learning in our community,” said Jeffrey Duerk, UM Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. Founded by UM alumnus Rony Abovitz, Magic Leap’s mixed reality technology allows users to blend digital content with their own physical environment. Last fall (2018), Magic Leap and UM entered into a collaboration where the University would serve as a pilot location for the company to experiment with its first-generation headsets, called "Magic Leap One".     As part of the collaboration, each college was given some of the headsets for faculty and students to use with the goal that the UM community would develop Magic Leap applications. So far, several ideas have been developed, but the Provost hopes this latest round of grants will generate more. “Faculty have responded enthusiastically to the information sessions,” said Jean-Pierre Bardet, Vice Provost for Strategic Projects and Dean of the College of Engineering. “That will undoubtedly lead to great successes.”  UM Information Technology’s Director of Innovation, Max Cacchione, leads the XR Garage on the fifth floor of the McArthur Engineering Building, which is one of the places faculty, staff and students can experience Magic Leap’s technology, in addition to the Magic Leap Lab on...

read more

Lunch & Learn: Computational Modeling of Brain Networks 1/22/2020

Posted by on 9:30 am in Events - Past, News - Archived | Comments Off on Lunch & Learn: Computational Modeling of Brain Networks 1/22/2020

Lunch & Learn: Computational Modeling of Brain Networks 1/22/2020

RSVP now Wednesday, January 22, 2020  |  12:00-1:30 PM Shalala Student Center, Vista Room 308 Speaker:  Michael Mannino, PhD  |  CCS Director of Programs In this session, Dr. Michael Mannino will describe and show how  “The Virtual Brain,” a neuroinformatics package, simulates the human brain, using a computational model that explores the dynamics of large-scale brain networks, and information flow between different brain regions underpinning cognitive processes like working memory, attention, and perception. He will also discuss other conceptual issues about the use of simulation and computation in neuroscience. This lecture is free to UM Faculty/Staff/Students.   Light Lunch will be provided.  Speaker Bio: Dr. Michael Mannino joined the CCS in April 2019 as Director of Programs. He has his PhD in complex systems and brain sciences, and his research was in computational neuroscience, specifically computational modeling of large-scale brain networks using nonlinear dynamical systems and neural time series analysis. Michael also has his Masters in philosophy, focusing on the philosophy of science, and philosophy of mind, and has been a professor of philosophy at Miami Dade College, teaching several courses. He is passionate about the topics of science communication, complexity science, and all things brain.   Please RSVP if you plan to attend.    ...

read more

Poster Presentation Winners Announced for Big Data + VizUM 2019

Posted by on 3:48 pm in Events - Past, News - Archived, VizUM Events - Archived | Comments Off on Poster Presentation Winners Announced for Big Data + VizUM 2019

Poster Presentation Winners Announced for Big Data + VizUM 2019

Students, researchers, and patrons from the University of Miami, FIU, Ransom Everglades School, and the local community gathered at Robert and Judi Prokop Newman Alumni Center for the combined annual Big Data Conference and VizUM Symposium, held on Wednesday, December 11, 2019. The event began in the Bruce & Robbi Toll Library with Poster Presentations. This was the event’s first call for posters and cash prizes were at stake! Big Data Conference The Big Data Conference officially opened with a few words from CCS Center Director Nick Tsinoremas who welcomed the audience to the fourth annual Big Data Conference and the sixth annual VizUM Symposium. Nick also introduced the event’s keynote speaker, Matthew Denesuk, Senior Vice President for Data Analytics + AI for Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd. Matthew took to the stage and delivered to the audience a talk on the relevance, necessity, and importance of data analytics and artificial intelligence in the business and corporate realms.  Overall, he spoke at length of the nature of data-driven transformations (including the types of data scientists involved in those transformations) at the organizational level.  (Click here for Matthew's slides) The Conference featured a panel discussion that focused on “Digital Disruption:” how big data, data analytics, and artificial intelligence are impacting various aspects of the business world, including health care, cybersecurity, and real estate. The panelists, Ashwin Kumar (Associate Vice President, Revenue Cycle Management at Jackson Health System), Roy Lowrance, PhD (Founder + CEO of Applied Data Science, LLC), Olivia Ramos (Founder + CEO of Deepblocks), and Yuda Saydun (Founder + President of CyVent), answered a variety of questions from both the moderator, Nick Tsinoremas, and from the audience. VizUM 2019 Distinguished guest speaker Jessica Hullman PhD, an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Journalism at Northwestern University, was the opener for VizUM 2019. Her talk  entitled “Supporting Reasoning with Uncertainty Using Data” described how visualization techniques for conveying uncertainty through discrete samples can improve non-experts’ ability to understand and make decisions from distributional information. Jessica also described what’s been learned by developing visualization interfaces that encourage users to reflect on their expectations and use them to predict and improve belief updating. Jessica was followed by Alberto Cairo PhD, who addressed the audience with his talk “How Charts Lie: What You Design Isn’t What People See.” Alberto is CCS Visualization Program Director, and Associate Professor and Knight Chair in Visual Journalism in UM’s School of Communication. He explained how scientists, statisticians, designers, and journalists are often taught that “a picture is worth a thousand words”, that we should “show, don’t tell”, and that charts are “intuitive” and useful to “simplify” information. His talk explained why these ideas are myths that if taken at face value, are wrong and dangerous. Alberto went on to explain what we can do to help the public increase their visual literacy and understand charts, graphs, maps, and infographics better.  (Click here for Alberto's slides) Poster Presentations Poster Presentation winners were announced with the first-place prize ($500) awarded to Ransom Everglades student, Joseph Gross, et al. for “Machine Learning for Metal Identification in Water Samples using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).” The poster won for originality, scientific rigor, organization, and presentation of the topic. The second-place award ($250) went to University of Miami student Chitra Banarjee, et al., for...

read more

UM-led Experiment Closes Critical Gap in Weather Forecasting

Posted by on 9:11 am in News - Archived | Comments Off on UM-led Experiment Closes Critical Gap in Weather Forecasting

UM-led Experiment Closes Critical Gap in Weather Forecasting

Scientists working on the next frontier of weather forecasting are hoping that weather conditions 3-to-4 weeks out will soon be as readily available as seven-day forecasts. Having this type of weather information—called subseasonal forecasts—in the hands of the public and emergency managers can provide the critical lead time necessary to prepare for natural hazards like heat waves or the next polar vortex. Scientists like University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Professor Ben Kirtman and Assistant Professor Kathleen Pegion at George Mason University are leading the way to close this critical gap in the weather forecast system through the SubX project. SubX—short for The Subseasonal Experiment—is a research-to-operations project to provide better subseasonal forecasts to the National Weather Service. “Subseasonal predictions is the most difficult timeframe to predict,” said Kirtman, a professor of atmospheric sciences and director of the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS). “The hardest part is taking all the observations and putting them into the model.” SubX is filling the gap between the prediction of weather and the prediction of seasonal conditions, which is guided by slowly evolving ocean conditions like sea surface temperatures and soil moisture and variability in the climate system that work on time scales of weeks. To get to the subseasonal scale, scientists need information on conditions that affects global weather such as large-scale convective anomalies like the Madden–Julian Oscillation in the tropical Indian Ocean into their computer models. “The SubX public database makes 3-4 week forecasts available right now and provides researchers the data infrastructure to investigate how to make them even better in the future,” said Pegion. SubX has already shown great promise forecasting weather conditions. It accurately predicted the amount of rainfall from Hurricane Michael-—roughly 50 mm, the 4th of July heat wave in Alaska where temperatures reached over 90 degrees Fahrenheit—20 to 30 degrees above average in some locations —and the polar vortex that hit the midwestern U.S. and eastern Canada in late January and killed 22 people. For Kirtman and his team, the power to make these predictions requires the capacity to compute and store a large amount of data. This means they depend heavily on the UM Center for Computational Science’s computing capability to handle the complex computation needed for their models. CCS resources are critical for Kirtman and Pegion to meet the on-time, in-real-time, all-the-time deadlines required for SubX to be successful. SubX’s publicly available database contains 17 years of historical reforecasts (1999–2015) and more than 18 months of real-time forecasts for use by the research community and the National Weather Service. As Kirtman and his research team pointed out in an Oct. 2019 article in the American Meteorological Society’s journal BAMS,  “early warning of heat waves, extreme cold, flooding rains, flash drought, or other weather hazards as far as 4 weeks into the future could allow for risk reduction and disaster preparedness, potentially preserving life and resources. Less extreme, but no less important, reliable probabilistic forecasts about the potential for warmer, colder, wetter, or drier conditions at a few weeks lead are valuable for routine planning and resource management.” SOURCE:  NEWS@TheU Also appeared in . . . https://world-news-monitor.com/climate/2019/12/07/closing-critical-gap-in-weather-forecasting-subx-a-research-to-operations-project-shows-promise-for-improved-monthly-forecasts/ https://elexonic.com/2019/12/08/experiment-closes-critical-gap-in-weather-forecasting/ https://e-news.us/experiment-closes-critical-gap-in-weather-forecasting-phys-org/ https://www.longroom.com/discussion/1724969/closing-critical-gap-in-weather-forecasting https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/12/191207073539.htm https://www.democraticunderground.com/122867118 https://www.santech360.com/2019/12/um-led-experiment-closes-critical-gap-in-weather-forecasting.html https://www.democraticunderground.com/122867118# https://www.sciencecodex.com/um-led-experiment-closes-critical-gap-weather-forecasting-636420 http://healthmedicinet.com/um-led-experiment-closes-critical-gap-in-weather-forecasting/ https://www.brightsurf.com/news/article/120619498695/um-led-experiment-closes-critical-gap-in-weather-forecasting.html https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-12/uomr-uec120619.php...

read more

Office Hours-CANCELLED

Posted by on 9:59 am in News | Comments Off on Office Hours-CANCELLED

Office Hours-CANCELLED

After careful consideration, the Institute for Data Science & Computing Solutions Center Office Hours sessions previously scheduled on all 3 campuses have been CANCELLED until further notice due to statewide precautions for the COVID-19 Coronavirus, and the State of Florida’s public health emergency declaration. The Institute for Data Science and Computing is committed to the health and welfare of the University students, Staff, and Faculty, and the community as a whole, and have decided to err on the side of safety. If you need computational help, the answer may be found in the documentation or frequently asked questions, or contact us via email at hpc@ccs.miami.edu When composing your email, please provide a detailed description of the problem, paths to your job file and any outputs, the software modules you have loaded, and your job ID when appropriate. Suggestions computer and operating system you are using your account ID complete path to your job script file, program, or job submission complete path to output files (if any) error message(s) received module(s) loaded ($ module list) whether this job ran previously and what has changed since it last worked steps you may have already taken to address your issues For questions or concerns, please call 305-243-4962. The Advanced Computing core has a mission to provide the University of Miami’s academic community with comprehensive advanced computing resources ranging from hardware infrastructure to expertise in designing and implementing high-performance solutions. Office Hours The Advanced Computing Team offers office assistance with usage issues on the new TRITON supercomputer and/or the Pegasus cluster.  During the office hours below, the team can provide assistance with queuing inquiries,  software installation, and technical troubleshooting. The team is ready to answer questions regarding grant proposals, and can provide resource information about the Advanced Computing environment. Coral Gables Campus:  Thursdays 2-4:30 PM  |  Ungar 330E  |  Kalan Dawson, Systems Administrator [NOTE: No Gables Office Hours on 2/27/2020; Extra day added Tuesday 2/18.] RSMAS Campus:  Wednesdays  9-11  AM  |  MSC 223  |  Warner Baringer, Senior Analyst/Systems Engineer Medical Campus: Wednesdays  10 AM-2 PM  |  Soffer CRC 7th Floor  |  Pedro Davila, Systems Administrator [NOTE: No Medical Office Hours on 2/26/2020.]...

read more
CCS
Skip to toolbar