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Computational Science is widely recognized as a critical means to solving many of today’s most challenging problems.  The analysis and knowledge gained from working with the incredible data explosion produced by massive experiments, observations and computer generated models is leading to solutions at an unimagined pace. Data-Intensive discovery (the fourth paradigm of scientific research), and Multi Scale Interdisciplinary  approaches are becoming more prevalent in the way that Science and Engineering is generating...

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Mapic Leap “The U Experience” lands at Richter Library through 12/11

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Mapic Leap “The U Experience” lands at Richter Library through 12/11

The U Experience is a immersive augmented reality application that offers the exploration of the University of Miami Coral Gables campus through a lightweight Magic Leap wearable device.  The U Experience is the result of a collaboration by a multi-disciplinary development team comprised of faculty, staff, and students from the University of Miami.   The U Experience is available to faculty and students through the fall semester (until December 11) in the Magic Leap Lab located in the Richter Library, room 326. To book a session, click here....

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Alberto Cairo on Misreading Data Visualizations in Scientific American

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Alberto Cairo on Misreading Data Visualizations in Scientific American

CCS Visualization Program Director Dr. Alberto Cairo has published "Does Obesity Shorten Lives: Misreading Data Visualizations Can Reinforce Biased Perceptions" in the Public Health section of Scientific American's September 2019 issue (p. 100). The September issue is titled ‘Truth, Lies & Uncertainty: Searching for Reality in Unreal Times’. It contains articles about how deception works (and not only among humans!), how dishonesty spreads, why we trust lies, and how we make decisions when having incomplete information. Dr. Cairo's favorite article in this issue is by Jessica Hullman (p. 80) who, perhaps not surprisingly he says, describes how to visualize uncertainty. Dr. Cairo's article explains the ecological fallacy, amalgamation paradoxes and—above all—focuses on how easy it is to misunderstand a chart if we describe its content sloppily, either to ourselves (mentally) or to others (verbally or textually). The example used is similar to one he borrowed from Heather Krause @datassist, which he showcases in his new book: How Charts Lie.   Read the full article at Scientific American, or download the whole issue....

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Students Gain Research Experience through AI and Computer Simulations

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Students Gain Research Experience through AI and Computer Simulations

New Technology that Rapidly Sifts Through Video to Identify if Paralyzed Mice are Able to Regain Movement with Experimental Drugs A Computer Program able to Simulate Chemical Reactions that Could Help Eliminate Harmful Solvents from Polluting the Earth These are just two projects completed by students in the computer science undergraduate research program wrapping up this week at the University of Miami. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the Research Experience for Undergraduates program, or REU, provided 10-week grants for college students from across the country to come study with University of Miami professors and help them advance their research goals. Now in its third year, the program allows UM faculty from science disciplines to harness the knowledge of tech-savvy students, while also offering the students a chance to explore one specific area of science before graduate school, said REU coordinator and computer science professor Burton Rosenberg. “We get students from all over and they bring unique elements to the program because they can go on to influence their colleagues and we are influenced as well,” Rosenberg said. “This benefits UM by reinforcing its national prominence as a research institution with important relationships across the United States.” Although the students are not required to be computer science majors, many of them have a technical understanding and then must take a week-long boot camp at the start of the summer program. They earn a stipend for their work, and are provided on-campus housing and a food allowance as part of the grant, Rosenberg said. Faculty at UM are glad to get the extra support.   Spinal Cord Injuries and Artificial Intelligence Vance Lemmon, the Walter G. Ross Distinguished Chair in Developmental Neuroscience at the Miller School of Medicine, works to find ways that people who have spinal cord injuries may regain movement. Lemmon has two undergraduate research fellows this summer: Juliana Hemela, and Victor Jann. In the past few weeks, Jann developed an artificial intelligence program to analyze videos of paralyzed mice and determine whether they are regaining motion in their paws and forearms.  “This speeds up our analysis and gives us a really important way to assess whether the treatments we are doing will be able to help people with spinal cord injury,” Lemmon said. Jann came to UM from the University of California-Berkeley, where he is a Computer Science major. Although he has always been interested in computers, Jann said he enjoyed applying his technology skills to benefit a science lab. Lemmon said he will continue to use Jann’s program to expedite his research so that later on, treatments can, hopefully, be tested in humans. “This has allowed me to see the real-world applications of computer science and data science,” Jann said. “I also saw what it was like to do research in a neuroscience lab. This is something I may be interested in.”   Computer Simulations of Chemical Experiments Courtney Sever from Florida State University and Azhar Moihdeen from Georgia Institute of Technology helped to bolster the research done by Orlando Acevedo, Associate Professor of Chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences. Acevedo, a Computational Chemist, is working to create more environmentally-safe solvents. Solvents are liquids essential in the creation of countless everyday products, including plastics and medicines. "Unfortunately, many of them can be harmful or...

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Frost Science Students Tour the Data Center and Viz Lab

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Frost Science Students Tour the Data Center and Viz Lab

This past Thursday July 25th, CCS hosted a field trip of middle schoolers from the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science.  Dr. Michael Mannino, CCS Director of Programs, and Joel Zysman, CCS Director of Advanced Computing and his team led the tour. The young "scientists-in-training" visited the data center in the Ungar building, and the Visualization laboratory, where they learned about: the basics of computational science, the importance of supercomputing, and the 2D- and 3D-visualization capabilities and techniques used by scientists and researchers at CCS. They had a fun and excellent educational experience, and left curious and inspired!   [gmedia...

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Enrico Capobianco Receives NIH + NSF Awards for Disease Research

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Enrico Capobianco Receives NIH + NSF Awards for Disease Research

Congratulations to Enrico Capobianco, PhD, Lead Senior Bioinformatics Scientist for CCS's Computational Biology & Bioinformatics program, on receiving two grants.   1. Dynamic Network Analysis of Huntingtin Interactome in Response to Cellular Stresses Funder National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) NIH Grant # R21NS111202 Investigators PI Jianning Wei, PhD | Florida Atlantic University Co-PI Enrico Capobianco, PhD | University of Miami   Abstract Neurons are selectively venerable with a low stressor-threshold in neurodegenerative diseases. At molecular levels, responses to cellular stresses are mediated by dynamic protein-protein interactions (PPI). Developing in-depth, dynamic PPI networks is therefore crucial to understand the pathogenesis of these diseases. Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the huntingtin (htt) gene. It is strongly suggested that Htt serves as a scaffold protein interacting with multiple protein complexes that are involved in diverse cellular functions. Our long-range goal is to understand the molecular functions of Htt and muHtt at various biological states. The objective of this multi- PI proposal is to map Htt/muHtt interactome under the proteotoxic stress. Our central hypothesis is that normal Htt remodels its interactome in response to cellular stresses and this capability is compromised in the presence of muHtt, causing accumulation of cellular damages overtime and eventually neurodegeneration. Specifically, the following two aims are proposed. Aim 1: Map the dynamic Htt/muHtt interactome in response to proteotoxic stress by unbiased quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. We will first establish an ascorbate peroxidase (APEX2)-based proximity labeling platform to spatiotemporally label Htt-interacting proteins in live cells. A striatal STHdhQ7 neuronal cell line stably expressing Htt-APEX2 will be subjected to three different conditions (normal, proteotoxic stress and stress recovery) followed by APEX2 labeling. Biotinylated proteins will then be identified by quantitative proteomics. The resulting protein list will be subjected to in-depth bioinformatic analyses. Aim 2: Quantitatively analyze the molecular responses of known Htt-interacting proteins to cellular stresses in normal and HD cells. We will focus on analyzing a signaling hub protein, p62, which directly interacts with Htt. Our working hypothesis is that Htt regulates the molecular responses of p62 to cellular stresses and the regulation is impaired in the presence of muHtt. To test this hypothesis, molecular changes of p62 to various stresses in normal and HD cells will be evaluated at (1) mRNA levels, (2) protein expression and (3) subcellular localization. The interaction between p62 and Htt/muHtt under various stresses will be quantified using the Htt-APEX2 platform. We are well-positioned to undertake the proposed study because our research team consists of uniquely qualified individuals with combined expertise in molecular neurobiology and large data analysis. Successful completion of these studies will contribute fundamental knowledge about molecular functions of normal and mutant Htt and the pathogenesis of HD. In a broader aspect, building dynamic interaction networks under diverse stress conditions could be the key to understand the molecular differences between healthy and any pathological states. The proposed research is highly innovative for its novel idea and approaches to study the dynamic nature of Htt interactome in response to stresses.   2. Collaborative Research: A Generalizable Data Framework Towards Precision Radiotherapy Funder National Science Foundation (NSF) NSF Grant # 1918925 Investigators Co-PI Jun Deng, PhD | Yale University Co-PI Enrico Capobianco, PhD | University of Miami Abstract In treating cancer...

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1st place Smart Cities Miami Competition Winners Featured on Vyond

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1st place Smart Cities Miami Competition Winners Featured on Vyond

CCS is proud to announce that the winning team's video for the inaugural Smart Cities Miami Design Your Coral Gables Competition has been featured on the Vyond animation program’s website. Kudos to "The Laboratory of Everyday Things -N.O.T." Team! Excerpt: Animation isn’t just an entertaining medium—it can also be a tool for driving positive social change. A team of architects in Coral Gables, Florida, used Vyond for exactly this purpose. Their award-winning video has the potential to significantly improve life in their city. The group of architects—known as The Laboratory of Everyday Things-N.O.T.—won first place in the Smart City Solutions Competition. Hosted by the University of Miami and the City of Coral Gables, the contest was created to help the city become more efficient and sustainable." For this year’s competition, entrants were asked to submit a proposal, including a five-minute video, for relieving traffic-related problems in Coral Gables. The Laboratory of Everyday Things was selected based on their proposal’s feasibility, impact, and originality, among other qualities. Read more and see the video at Vyond.com . ....

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Data Mining and Social Systems Informatics Present Paper at CVPR 2019

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Data Mining and Social Systems Informatics Present Paper at CVPR 2019

"Categorical Timeline Allocation and Alignment for Diagnostic Head Movement Tracking Feature Analysis"   Mitsunori Ogihara (Program Director) and Gang Ren (Postdoctoral Associate) of CCS's Big Data Analytics and Data Mining program, and Daniel Messinger, Program Director of CCS Social Systems Informatics, will present an interdisciplinary paper together at the workshop on Face and Gesture Analysis for Health Informatics (FGAHI) at CVPR 2019 (Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, part of IEEE CVF) 2019, June 16-21, 2019 in Long Beach, CA. The workshop will discuss  the strengths and major challenges in using computer vision and machine learning of automatic face and gesture analysis for clinical research and healthcare applications. Scientists working in related areas of computer vision and machine learning for face and gesture analysis, affective computing, human behavior sensing, and cognitive behavior, will share their expertise and achievements in the emerging field of computer vision and machine-learning-based face and gesture analysis for health informatics. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: Deep learning based face and gesture analysis for healthcare Deep learning based facial expression recognition for healthcare Remote physiological sensing for healthcare Human-Computer Interaction systems for healthcare Deep learning based multi-modal (visual and verbal) fusion for healthcare applications Clinical protocols for face and gesture analysis and modeling in clinical context Applications include but are not limited to: Automatic pain intensity measurement, automatic depression severity assessment, autism screening.   The paper, titled Categorical Timeline Allocation and Alignment for Diagnostic Head Movement Tracking Feature Analysis is authored by Mitsunori Ogihara, Zakia Hammal, Katherine B. Martin, Jeffrey F. Cohn, Justine Cassell, Gang Ren, and Daniel S. Messinger)   Abstract Atypical head movement pattern characterization is a potentially important cue for identifying children with autism spectrum disorder. In this paper, we implemented a computational framework for extracting the temporal patterns of head movement and utilizing the imbalance of temporal pattern distribution between diagnostic categories (e.g., children with or without autism spectrum disorder) as potential diagnostic cues. The timeline analysis results show a large number of temporal patterns with significant imbalances between diagnostic categories. The temporal patterns show strong classification power on discriminative and predictive analysis metrics. The long time-span temporal patterns (e.g., patterns spanning 15-30 sec.) exhibit stronger discriminative capabilities compared with the temporal patterns with relatively shorter time spans. Temporal patterns with high coverage ratios (existing in a large portion of the video durations) also show high discriminative capacity.  ...

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N.O.T. Lands 1st Place in the 2019 Smart City Solutions Competition

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N.O.T. Lands 1st Place in the 2019 Smart City Solutions Competition

  The final presentations for the inaugural Design Your Coral Gables: Smart City Solutions Competition were held at eMerge Americas on Monday, April 29, 2019. The event was led by Joel Zysman, Director, CCS Advanced Computing, and Raimundo Rodulfo, Director, IT for the City of Coral Gables. This three-month Competition, officially launched in January at the 3rd annual Smart Cities MIAMI Conference yielded some great ideas. The Competition was designed in collaboration with the University of Miami School of Architecture,  the Center for Computational Science, and the City of Coral Gables. Winners were selected by a panel of expert judges based on the proposal’s interconnectivity, originality, transparency, sustainability, feasibility, impact, cost effectiveness, and interdisciplinarity.  The Competition panel of judges included: Rodolphe el-Khoury (Dean, UM School of Architecture and Director, Smart Cities program, UM CCS) Pamela Fuertes (Director, Economic Development, City of Coral Gables) Chris Mader (Director, Software Engineering, UM CCS) Nelson Gonzalez (Assistant Director, IT, City of Coral Gables) , and Matt Anderson (Sr. Sustainability Analyst, City of Coral Gables).   FINALISTS The KAYROS team | Justo Vera-Ayesteran and Tupack Rhea | proposed UZIEL Charging Stations, addressing the need for public charging stations for electric vehicles.  Their presentation examined various citizen concerns such as: locating charging stations and available amenities while they wait. Their solution proposed leased, unattended, covered, modular charging stations with a smart floor, powered by solar panels that could also offset electrical costs during peak hours. The UZIEL charging stations would add a module to the existing City of Coral Gables mobile app, and could be grid-connected. The KAYROS team went on to earn 3rd place in the competition.   The SMART DAY CORAL GABLES team | Neil Schwam, Luis Carbonell, Elsa Mehary |  addressed the capitalization of existing data to identify patterns, using data directly from cell phones, as opposed to the Waze app that gets data from users.  This information would then be used for reverse marketing for City services.  This proposal landed the Smart Day Coral Gables team 2nd place in the competition.   THE LABORATORY OF EVERYDAY THINGS – N.O.T. (Neighborhood Oriented Transit) Team | Adib Cure, Rick Lopez, Chen  Mingyu, Teofilo Victoria, Rogelio Cadena, and Wang Jing | proposed combining existing local modes of transportation into one mobile app; providing users a schedule, service locations, and connections County-wide for services like:  Trolleys, Metrorail/Metromover, Hurry Canes Shuttle, Pedestrian Corridors, Bicycle Paths, County Bus Routes, County Shuttles, and the Free Bee. The Spin Scooters and Bikes data could also be incorporated into this mobile app.   Team POINCIANA II  | Zoheb Anjum, Andre Rivero-Guevara |  proposed the integration of Google traffic information with the County traffic lights controlling system.  The team connected with the Miami-Dade County Public Works and Waste Management office of Frank Aria, Chief, Traffic Signals and Signs Division to understand where the County is headed with transportation control, and what is current practice.  The team also explored what it would entail to have Coral Gables included in the management of this traffic lights/traffic flow.   WINNERS First place went to The Laboratory of Everyday Things – N.O.T. Team. Winners earned a cash prize coupled with other prizes from the City of Coral Gables Parks and Recreation.  All participants will be celebrated and recognized at the Coral Gables City Commission meeting on May 14,...

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Call For Papers: ICDM-TMDM 2019 Workshop 11/8-11 in Beijing

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Call For Papers: ICDM-TMDM 2019 Workshop 11/8-11 in Beijing

Call for Papers     Translational Multimedia Data Mining for AI-Based Medical Diagnostics - Bridging Digital Intelligence with Clinical Practices (TMDM for short) is a workshop collocated with ICDM 2019 (November 8 – 11, 2019) in Beijing, China.     Objective Recent developments of health informatics and digital medical diagnostics have accumulated a large amount of multimedia data. Typical examples include the face/gesture videos, medical scan image, sensor signals, and multimodal medical databases. The volume and complexity of these data provide significant data mining challenges as well as the opportunity to develop robust digital tools with clinical potentials. This workshop aims at bringing together researchers from medical data analysis, medical signal processing, health informatics, clinical research, statistical pattern recognition, machine learning, and artificial intelligence to share their recent progress and synergies. Emphasis will be on the potential towards translational medical research, clinical research and practice, AI-based diagnostic tools and databases, and a clinical-inclined integration of the data mining, bioinformatics, medical science, and clinical research areas.     Topics of Interests The topics of interests for the workshop include, but not limited to the following: Deep learning based multimedia analysis tools and applications for healthcare Deep learning based data mining tools for multimedia data retrieval Physiological and psychological sensing tools for healthcare data capturing, pre-processing, storage, retrieval, annotation, and utilization Clinical protocols and practices for multimedia content modeling and interpretation in clinical context AI-based diagnostic tools for improving medical operation efficiency and effectiveness Legal, ethical, and policy aspects of health informatics and AI medical data mining tools Operational and clinical trials of health informatics and machine-aided diagnostic tools Human factors, user-centered designs, integrative visualizations of data mining applications on medical science     Organizers Justine Cassell, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, USA Jeffrey Cohn, Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, USA Zakia Hammal, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, USA Katherine Martin, Tobii Pro, USA Daniel Messinger, Department of Psychology, University of Miami, USA Mitsunori Ogihara, Department of Computer Science, University of Miami, USA Gang Ren, Center for Computational Science, University of Miami, USA     Important Dates   Submission deadline extended to: August 20, 2019 Notification of acceptance: September 4, 2019 Camera-ready deadline and copyright forms: September 8, 2019 Workshop: TBD     Program Committee Oya Aran, IDIAP Research Institute, Switzerland Mohamed Chetouani, UPMC, France Jeffrey F. Cohn, University of Pittsburgh, USA Zakia Hammal, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, USA Hongying Meng, Brunel University London, UK Mitsunori Ogihara, Department of Computer Science, University of Miami, USA Gang Ren, Center for Computational Science, University of Miami, USA Akane Sano, Rice University, USA Babak Taati, University Health Network, Canada Lijun Yin, Department of Computing Science, SUNY at Binghampton University, USA   Related Links The IEEE ICDM 2019 Conference main page: http://icdm2019.bigke.org/ The Submission website: https://cmt3.research.microsoft.com/TMDM2019/Submission/Index     Contact     Mitsunori Ogihara | m.ogihara@miami.edu           Gang Ren | gxr467@miami.edu        ...

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Save the Date Tuesday 11/12 for VizUM 2019 “Uncertainty in Visualization”

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Save the Date Tuesday 11/12 for VizUM 2019 “Uncertainty in Visualization”

  VizUM 2019 has been scheduled for Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 4:00-7:00 PM at the Newman Alumni Center. REGISTER NOW Free   Speakers   Jessica Hullman, PhD Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Journalism, Northwestern University Jessica Hullman is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Journalism at Northwestern. The goal of her research is to develop computational tools that improve how people reason with and make decisions from data. She is especially interested in challenges that arise in presenting data to non-expert audiences, where the need to convey a clear story often conflicts with goals of transparency and faithful presentation of uncertainty. Her current research focus is on uncertainty representation through interactive visual interfaces that enable users to articulate and reason about their prior beliefs. Jessica's research has been supported by a Microsoft Faculty Fellowship, and awards from NSF (CRII, CAREER), Navy, Google, Tableau, and Adobe. Prior to joining Northwestern, she was an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington Information School. Her Ph.D. is from the University of Michigan and she spent a year as a Postdoctoral Scholar in Computer Science at the University of California Berkeley. Talk Title  "Supporting Reasoning with Uncertainty Using Data Visualization" Abstract Charts, graphs, and other information visualizations amplify cognition by enabling users to visually perceive trends and differences in quantitative data. While guidelines dictate how to choose visual encodings and metaphors to support accurate perception, it is less obvious how to design visualizations that encourage rational decisions and inference. Jessica will  motivate several challenges that must be overcome to support effective reasoning with visualizations. First, people's intuitions about uncertainty often conflict with statistical definitions. Jessica will describe how visualization techniques for conveying uncertainty through discrete samples can improve non-experts' ability to understand and make decisions from distributional information. Second, people often bring prior beliefs and expectations about data-driven phenomena to their interactions with data (e.g., I suspect support for candidate A is higher than reported), which influence their interpretations. Most design and evaluation techniques do not account for these influences. Jessica will describe what's been learned by developing visualization interfaces that encourage users to reflect on their expectations and use them to predict and improve belief updating. Alberto Cairo, PhD Associate Professor | Knight Chair in Visual Journalism UM School of Communication Alberto Cairo is an Associate Professor and Knight Chair in Visual Journalism at the University of Miami. He is also director of the visualization program of UM's Center for Computational Science. Cairo spent more than a decade working in the news industry, as director of information graphics in publications in Spain and Brazil. He also works as a freelancer and permanent consultant for companies and government entities such as Google and the Congressional Budget Office. Cairo is the author of three books about visualization, 'The Functional Art' (2013), 'The Truthful Art' (2016), and the upcoming 'How Charts Lie: Getting Smarter about Visual Information' (October 2019). Talk Title "How Charts Lie: What You Design is Not What People See" Scientists, statisticians, designers, and journalists are often taught that "a picture is worth a thousand words", that we should "show, don't tell", and that charts are "intuitive" and useful to "simplify" information. This talk explains why these myths, if taken at face value, are wrong and dangerous, and what we can...

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