News & Events



HOME  orange arrow  News & Events

Posted by on 8:06 pm in Welcome | Comments Off on

Computational Science is widely recognized as a critical means to solving many of today’s most challenging problems.  The analysis and knowledge gained from working with the incredible data explosion produced by massive experiments, observations and computer generated models is leading to solutions at an unimagined pace. Data-Intensive discovery (the fourth paradigm of scientific research), and Multi Scale Interdisciplinary  approaches are becoming more prevalent in the way that Science and Engineering is generating...

read more

1st place Smart Cities Miami Competition Winners Featured on Vyond

Posted by on 12:08 pm in News | Comments Off on 1st place Smart Cities Miami Competition Winners Featured on Vyond

1st place Smart Cities Miami Competition Winners Featured on Vyond

CCS is proud to announce that the winning team's video for the inaugural Smart Cities Miami Design Your Coral Gables Competition has been featured on the Vyond animation program’s website. Kudos to "The Laboratory of Everyday Things -N.O.T." Team! Excerpt: Animation isn’t just an entertaining medium—it can also be a tool for driving positive social change. A team of architects in Coral Gables, Florida, used Vyond for exactly this purpose. Their award-winning video has the potential to significantly improve life in their city. The group of architects—known as The Laboratory of Everyday Things-N.O.T.—won first place in the Smart City Solutions Competition. Hosted by the University of Miami and the City of Coral Gables, the contest was created to help the city become more efficient and sustainable." For this year’s competition, entrants were asked to submit a proposal, including a five-minute video, for relieving traffic-related problems in Coral Gables. The Laboratory of Everyday Things was selected based on their proposal’s feasibility, impact, and originality, among other qualities. Read more and see the video at Vyond.com . ....

read more

Data Mining and Social Systems Informatics Present Paper at CVPR 2019

Posted by on 9:58 am in News - Archived | Comments Off on Data Mining and Social Systems Informatics Present Paper at CVPR 2019

Data Mining and Social Systems Informatics Present Paper at CVPR 2019

"Categorical Timeline Allocation and Alignment for Diagnostic Head Movement Tracking Feature Analysis"   Mitsunori Ogihara (Program Director) and Gang Ren (Postdoctoral Associate) of CCS's Big Data Analytics and Data Mining program, and Daniel Messinger, Program Director of CCS Social Systems Informatics, will present an interdisciplinary paper together at the workshop on Face and Gesture Analysis for Health Informatics (FGAHI) at CVPR 2019 (Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, part of IEEE CVF) 2019, June 16-21, 2019 in Long Beach, CA. The workshop will discuss  the strengths and major challenges in using computer vision and machine learning of automatic face and gesture analysis for clinical research and healthcare applications. Scientists working in related areas of computer vision and machine learning for face and gesture analysis, affective computing, human behavior sensing, and cognitive behavior, will share their expertise and achievements in the emerging field of computer vision and machine-learning-based face and gesture analysis for health informatics. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: Deep learning based face and gesture analysis for healthcare Deep learning based facial expression recognition for healthcare Remote physiological sensing for healthcare Human-Computer Interaction systems for healthcare Deep learning based multi-modal (visual and verbal) fusion for healthcare applications Clinical protocols for face and gesture analysis and modeling in clinical context Applications include but are not limited to: Automatic pain intensity measurement, automatic depression severity assessment, autism screening.   The paper, titled Categorical Timeline Allocation and Alignment for Diagnostic Head Movement Tracking Feature Analysis is authored by Mitsunori Ogihara, Zakia Hammal, Katherine B. Martin, Jeffrey F. Cohn, Justine Cassell, Gang Ren, and Daniel S. Messinger)   Abstract Atypical head movement pattern characterization is a potentially important cue for identifying children with autism spectrum disorder. In this paper, we implemented a computational framework for extracting the temporal patterns of head movement and utilizing the imbalance of temporal pattern distribution between diagnostic categories (e.g., children with or without autism spectrum disorder) as potential diagnostic cues. The timeline analysis results show a large number of temporal patterns with significant imbalances between diagnostic categories. The temporal patterns show strong classification power on discriminative and predictive analysis metrics. The long time-span temporal patterns (e.g., patterns spanning 15-30 sec.) exhibit stronger discriminative capabilities compared with the temporal patterns with relatively shorter time spans. Temporal patterns with high coverage ratios (existing in a large portion of the video durations) also show high discriminative capacity.  ...

read more

N.O.T. Lands 1st Place in the 2019 Smart City Solutions Competition

Posted by on 5:46 pm in Events - Past, News - Archived, Smart Cities Events - Archived | Comments Off on N.O.T. Lands 1st Place in the 2019 Smart City Solutions Competition

N.O.T. Lands 1st Place in the 2019 Smart City Solutions Competition

  The final presentations for the inaugural Design Your Coral Gables: Smart City Solutions Competition were held at eMerge Americas on Monday, April 29, 2019. The event was led by Joel Zysman, Director, CCS Advanced Computing, and Raimundo Rodulfo, Director, IT for the City of Coral Gables. This three-month Competition, officially launched in January at the 3rd annual Smart Cities MIAMI Conference yielded some great ideas. The Competition was designed in collaboration with the University of Miami School of Architecture,  the Center for Computational Science, and the City of Coral Gables. Winners were selected by a panel of expert judges based on the proposal’s interconnectivity, originality, transparency, sustainability, feasibility, impact, cost effectiveness, and interdisciplinarity.  The Competition panel of judges included: Rodolphe el-Khoury (Dean, UM School of Architecture and Director, Smart Cities program, UM CCS) Pamela Fuertes (Director, Economic Development, City of Coral Gables) Chris Mader (Director, Software Engineering, UM CCS) Nelson Gonzalez (Assistant Director, IT, City of Coral Gables) , and Matt Anderson (Sr. Sustainability Analyst, City of Coral Gables).   FINALISTS The KAYROS team | Justo Vera-Ayesteran and Tupack Rhea | proposed UZIEL Charging Stations, addressing the need for public charging stations for electric vehicles.  Their presentation examined various citizen concerns such as: locating charging stations and available amenities while they wait. Their solution proposed leased, unattended, covered, modular charging stations with a smart floor, powered by solar panels that could also offset electrical costs during peak hours. The UZIEL charging stations would add a module to the existing City of Coral Gables mobile app, and could be grid-connected. The KAYROS team went on to earn 3rd place in the competition.   The SMART DAY CORAL GABLES team | Neil Schwam, Luis Carbonell, Elsa Mehary |  addressed the capitalization of existing data to identify patterns, using data directly from cell phones, as opposed to the Waze app that gets data from users.  This information would then be used for reverse marketing for City services.  This proposal landed the Smart Day Coral Gables team 2nd place in the competition.   THE LABORATORY OF EVERYDAY THINGS – N.O.T. (Neighborhood Oriented Transit) Team | Adib Cure, Rick Lopez, Chen  Mingyu, Teofilo Victoria, Rogelio Cadena, and Wang Jing | proposed combining existing local modes of transportation into one mobile app; providing users a schedule, service locations, and connections County-wide for services like:  Trolleys, Metrorail/Metromover, Hurry Canes Shuttle, Pedestrian Corridors, Bicycle Paths, County Bus Routes, County Shuttles, and the Free Bee. The Spin Scooters and Bikes data could also be incorporated into this mobile app.   Team POINCIANA II  | Zoheb Anjum, Andre Rivero-Guevara |  proposed the integration of Google traffic information with the County traffic lights controlling system.  The team connected with the Miami-Dade County Public Works and Waste Management office of Frank Aria, Chief, Traffic Signals and Signs Division to understand where the County is headed with transportation control, and what is current practice.  The team also explored what it would entail to have Coral Gables included in the management of this traffic lights/traffic flow.   WINNERS First place went to The Laboratory of Everyday Things – N.O.T. Team. Winners earned a cash prize coupled with other prizes from the City of Coral Gables Parks and Recreation.  All participants will be celebrated and recognized at the Coral Gables City Commission meeting on May 14,...

read more

Call For Papers: ICDM-TMDM 2019 Workshop 11/8-11 in Beijing

Posted by on 11:00 am in News | Comments Off on Call For Papers: ICDM-TMDM 2019 Workshop 11/8-11 in Beijing

Call For Papers: ICDM-TMDM 2019 Workshop 11/8-11 in Beijing

Call for Papers     Translational Multimedia Data Mining for AI-Based Medical Diagnostics - Bridging Digital Intelligence with Clinical Practices (TMDM for short) is a workshop collocated with ICDM 2019 (November 8 – 11, 2019) in Beijing, China.     Objective Recent developments of health informatics and digital medical diagnostics have accumulated a large amount of multimedia data. Typical examples include the face/gesture videos, medical scan image, sensor signals, and multimodal medical databases. The volume and complexity of these data provide significant data mining challenges as well as the opportunity to develop robust digital tools with clinical potentials. This workshop aims at bringing together researchers from medical data analysis, medical signal processing, health informatics, clinical research, statistical pattern recognition, machine learning, and artificial intelligence to share their recent progress and synergies. Emphasis will be on the potential towards translational medical research, clinical research and practice, AI-based diagnostic tools and databases, and a clinical-inclined integration of the data mining, bioinformatics, medical science, and clinical research areas.     Topics of Interests The topics of interests for the workshop include, but not limited to the following: Deep learning based multimedia analysis tools and applications for healthcare Deep learning based data mining tools for multimedia data retrieval Physiological and psychological sensing tools for healthcare data capturing, pre-processing, storage, retrieval, annotation, and utilization Clinical protocols and practices for multimedia content modeling and interpretation in clinical context AI-based diagnostic tools for improving medical operation efficiency and effectiveness Legal, ethical, and policy aspects of health informatics and AI medical data mining tools Operational and clinical trials of health informatics and machine-aided diagnostic tools Human factors, user-centered designs, integrative visualizations of data mining applications on medical science     Organizers Justine Cassell, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, USA Jeffrey Cohn, Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, USA Zakia Hammal, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, USA Katherine Martin, Tobii Pro, USA Daniel Messinger, Department of Psychology, University of Miami, USA Mitsunori Ogihara, Department of Computer Science, University of Miami, USA Gang Ren, Center for Computational Science, University of Miami, USA     Important Dates   Submission deadline: August 7, 2019 Notification of acceptance: September 4, 2019 Camera-ready deadline and copyright forms: September 8, 2019 Workshop: TBD     Program Committee Oya Aran, IDIAP Research Institute, Switzerland Mohamed Chetouani, UPMC, France Jeffrey F. Cohn, University of Pittsburgh, USA Zakia Hammal, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, USA Hongying Meng, Brunel University London, UK Mitsunori Ogihara, Department of Computer Science, University of Miami, USA Gang Ren, Center for Computational Science, University of Miami, USA Akane Sano, Rice University, USA Babak Taati, University Health Network, Canada Lijun Yin, Department of Computing Science, SUNY at Binghampton University, USA   Related Links The IEEE ICDM 2019 Conference main page: http://icdm2019.bigke.org/ The Submission website: https://cmt3.research.microsoft.com/TMDM2019/Submission/Index     Contact     Mitsunori Ogihara | m.ogihara@miami.edu           Gang Ren | gxr467@miami.edu        ...

read more

Save the Date Tuesday 11/12 for VizUM 2019 “Uncertainty in Visualization”

Posted by on 10:59 am in Lectures & Seminars, News, VizUM Events | Comments Off on Save the Date Tuesday 11/12 for VizUM 2019 “Uncertainty in Visualization”

Save the Date Tuesday 11/12 for VizUM 2019 “Uncertainty in Visualization”

  VizUM 2019 has been scheduled for Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 4:00-7:00 PM at the Newman Alumni Center. REGISTER NOW Free   Speakers   Jessica Hullman, PhD Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Journalism, Northwestern University Jessica Hullman is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Journalism at Northwestern. The goal of her research is to develop computational tools that improve how people reason with and make decisions from data. She is especially interested in challenges that arise in presenting data to non-expert audiences, where the need to convey a clear story often conflicts with goals of transparency and faithful presentation of uncertainty. Her current research focus is on uncertainty representation through interactive visual interfaces that enable users to articulate and reason about their prior beliefs. Jessica's research has been supported by a Microsoft Faculty Fellowship, and awards from NSF (CRII, CAREER), Navy, Google, Tableau, and Adobe. Prior to joining Northwestern, she was an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington Information School. Her Ph.D. is from the University of Michigan and she spent a year as a Postdoctoral Scholar in Computer Science at the University of California Berkeley. Talk Title  "Supporting Reasoning with Uncertainty Using Data Visualization" Abstract Charts, graphs, and other information visualizations amplify cognition by enabling users to visually perceive trends and differences in quantitative data. While guidelines dictate how to choose visual encodings and metaphors to support accurate perception, it is less obvious how to design visualizations that encourage rational decisions and inference. Jessica will  motivate several challenges that must be overcome to support effective reasoning with visualizations. First, people's intuitions about uncertainty often conflict with statistical definitions. Jessica will describe how visualization techniques for conveying uncertainty through discrete samples can improve non-experts' ability to understand and make decisions from distributional information. Second, people often bring prior beliefs and expectations about data-driven phenomena to their interactions with data (e.g., I suspect support for candidate A is higher than reported), which influence their interpretations. Most design and evaluation techniques do not account for these influences. Jessica will describe what's been learned by developing visualization interfaces that encourage users to reflect on their expectations and use them to predict and improve belief updating. Alberto Cairo, PhD Associate Professor | Knight Chair in Visual Journalism UM School of Communication Alberto Cairo is an Associate Professor and Knight Chair in Visual Journalism at the University of Miami. He is also director of the visualization program of UM's Center for Computational Science. Cairo spent more than a decade working in the news industry, as director of information graphics in publications in Spain and Brazil. He also works as a freelancer and permanent consultant for companies and government entities such as Google and the Congressional Budget Office. Cairo is the author of three books about visualization, 'The Functional Art' (2013), 'The Truthful Art' (2016), and the upcoming 'How Charts Lie: Getting Smarter about Visual Information' (October 2019). Talk Title "How Charts Lie: What You Design is Not What People See" Scientists, statisticians, designers, and journalists are often taught that "a picture is worth a thousand words", that we should "show, don't tell", and that charts are "intuitive" and useful to "simplify" information. This talk explains why these myths, if taken at face value, are wrong and dangerous, and what we can...

read more

Save the Date Tuesday 11/12 for VizUM 2019 “Uncertainty in Visualization”

Posted by on 10:59 am in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Save the Date Tuesday 11/12 for VizUM 2019 “Uncertainty in Visualization”

Save the Date Tuesday 11/12 for VizUM 2019 “Uncertainty in Visualization”

  Data Visualization is at the core, and it is a burgeoning field of study at the University of Miami and other top academic research institutions. From devising app-based tools, to organizing vast scientific datum into bite-size morsels, data visualizers often begin their career journey as computer scientists, journalists, academic researchers, coders, or graphic designers. The common thread is that they have all developed a keen interest in recasting complex data in visually appealing ways to broaden the understanding of the world in which we live. VizUM is a free, annual Data Visualization Symposium held at the University of Miami featuring speakers who are pioneers in the field, whose vision drive products and styles we see around us daily, and who forge new ground in this domain.  VizUM 2019 has been scheduled for Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 4:00-7:00 PM at the Newman Alumni Center. Guest Speakers are Jessica Hullman, PhD, Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Journalism at Northwestern University | Talk Title  "Supporting Reasoning with Uncertainty Using Data Visualization", and Alberto Cairo, PhD, Knight Chair in Visual Journalism at the University of Miami School of Communication | Talk Title "How Charts Lie: What You Design is Not What People See". REGISTER NOW Free | Facebook Event Page   Speakers   Jessica Hullman, PhD Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Journalism, Northwestern University Jessica Hullman is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Journalism at Northwestern. The goal of her research is to develop computational tools that improve how people reason with and make decisions from data. She is especially interested in challenges that arise in presenting data to non-expert audiences, where the need to convey a clear story often conflicts with goals of transparency and faithful presentation of uncertainty. Her current research focus is on uncertainty representation through interactive visual interfaces that enable users to articulate and reason about their prior beliefs. Jessica's research has been supported by a Microsoft Faculty Fellowship, and awards from NSF (CRII, CAREER), Navy, Google, Tableau, and Adobe. Prior to joining Northwestern, she was an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington Information School. Her Ph.D. is from the University of Michigan and she spent a year as a Postdoctoral Scholar in Computer Science at the University of California Berkeley. Talk Title  "Supporting Reasoning with Uncertainty Using Data Visualization" Abstract Charts, graphs, and other information visualizations amplify cognition by enabling users to visually perceive trends and differences in quantitative data. While guidelines dictate how to choose visual encodings and metaphors to support accurate perception, it is less obvious how to design visualizations that encourage rational decisions and inference. Jessica will  motivate several challenges that must be overcome to support effective reasoning with visualizations. First, people's intuitions about uncertainty often conflict with statistical definitions. Jessica will describe how visualization techniques for conveying uncertainty through discrete samples can improve non-experts' ability to understand and make decisions from distributional information. Second, people often bring prior beliefs and expectations about data-driven phenomena to their interactions with data (e.g., I suspect support for candidate A is higher than reported), which influence their interpretations. Most design and evaluation techniques do not account for these influences. Jessica will describe what's been learned by developing visualization interfaces that encourage users to reflect on their expectations and use them to predict and improve belief...

read more

Save the Date 12/5/2019 for the 4th annual Big Data Conference

Posted by on 10:58 am in Events, News | Comments Off on Save the Date 12/5/2019 for the 4th annual Big Data Conference

Save the Date 12/5/2019 for the 4th annual Big Data Conference

Register Here! (Free) Big data, advanced computing, and algorithms are rapidly and profoundly changing every sphere of human activity; Airbnb, Uber, and Fitbit are just a few examples. Today, over 3.6 billion people worldwide are deeply engaged with smartphone devices, wearables, and Internet-of-things technologies while artificial intelligence also promises to create a wave of new products. Advanced computing gives us the ability to reliably and cost effectively store petabytes of data; and machine learning algorithms can crunch through massive datasets in real time to extract business intelligence and socially relevant information, giving firms new marketing tools, like mobile geo-social targeting. These tools have also empowered customers, making them more savvy in their interactions with business. The businesses, nonprofits, health care providers, government agencies, entrepreneurs, and educational institutions that harness these trends have an historic opportunity to gain an advantage over their competitors. CCS, in collaboration with the College of Arts and Sciences and the Miami Business School invites you to participate in panel discussions on Big Data, and to network with south Florida private- and public-sector policy makers, entrepreneurs, educators, and researchers, and  healthcare providers. This year's event focuses on capacity building and cybersecurity and will be hosted in the Miami Business School Storer Auditorium located at 5250 University Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 beginning at 2:00 PM. Agenda 1:00-2:00 Registration 2:00 Welcome Address 2:30 PANEL 1  4:00  PANEL 2    5:30-7:00 Networking Reception  Location Miami Business School Storer Auditorium, 5250 University Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146   |  Directions + Event Parking information TBA   Parking Instructions (Free) Anyone with a UM parking permit does not need register their vehicle Non-UM Speakers and Moderators will be given specific parking instructions All other non-UM attendees will be given a link to register their vehicles (just enter your license plate number) Your Big Data event parking session is valid from 12/6 at 1:00 PM until 8:00 PM Approved parking locations Red Zone Lot 209 A-B-C based on availability.  ...

read more

Joseph Brancato to keynote Smart Cities MIAMI 2020

Posted by on 10:54 am in Events, News, Smart Cities - Events | Comments Off on Joseph Brancato to keynote Smart Cities MIAMI 2020

Joseph Brancato to keynote Smart Cities MIAMI 2020

CCS and the School of Architecture are pleased to announce the Smart Cities MIAMI 2020 Keynote Speaker is Joseph Brancato, FAIA, NCARB, Vice Chairman, Gensler. Joe is a Managing Principal for Gensler’s Northeast and Latin America Regions, with offices in: New York; Morristown, NJ; Boston; Toronto; San José, Costa Rica; São Paulo; Mexico City; and Bogotá consisting of over 1,300 professionals. He is Vice Chairman of the firm’s Board of Directors, for which he sits on the Executive & Governance Committee and the Global Practice Committee. With vision and focus, Joe has led Gensler into new markets, providing leadership to the architecture, urban planning and design studios. He provides thought leadership and regularly speaks on topics such as the impact of driverless cars and ride-sharing on urban planning and development, designing futures cities, experience-driven design, and the urbanization of suburbia. Joe is also active in talent development and mentoring, having shaped Gensler’s gconnect program, which focuses on professional development for next-generation leaders in the firm. Engaged in professional outreach, he is an active member of the AIA (American Institute of Architects), NAIOP (National Association of Industrial and Office Properties), ULI (Urban Land Institute), Urban Design Forum, and CoreNet Global. He is a registered architect in 23 U.S. states and three Canadian provinces. Joe holds Bachelor Degrees in Architecture and Urban Studies from the University of Maryland. Save the date Tuesday, April 2, 2020 and join us on campus at the Jorge M. Perez Architecture Center.   2020 Sponsorship Opportunities | Program Booklet Showcase Opportunities Apply to be an Exhibitor: Limited Spaces are free  | Flyer + Application Form...

read more

UM School of Architecture and Urbetica Sign a Gift Agreement

Posted by on 10:35 am in News | Comments Off on UM School of Architecture and Urbetica Sign a Gift Agreement

UM School of Architecture and Urbetica Sign a Gift Agreement

University of Miami’s School of Architecture (SoA), and donor, Urbetica, signed a gift agreement on May 30, 2019, at El Colegio Nacional in Mexico City. (El Colegio Nacional is a Mexican honorary academy with a strictly limited membership, created in 1943 by presidential decree in order to bring together the country's foremost artists and scientists, who are periodically invited to deliver lectures and seminars in their respective area of specialty.) This gift will provide initial funding to support research on smart city design and planning, extending the work done by SoA's Responsive Architecture and Design Lab (RAD Lab), in partnership with UM’s Center for Computation Science (CCS) on Zenciti, a planned smart city in the Yucatán peninsula near Merida, Mexico. "With Zenciti, we had the rare opportunity of designing a smart city from scratch, from urban planning and design, to smart infrastructure and services," said Rodolphe el-Khoury, Dean of the School of Architecture. "The support of Urbetica, the development force behind Zenciti, now allows us to continue to research and innovate in this field, at the confluence of urbanism and technology," commented el-Khoury. He was joined for the signing by Jorge Ivan Espadas Espinosa, CEO and Jorge Solis Buenfil, Partner, Urbetica S.A.P.I de C.V.; and Joshua M. Friedman, senior vice president for Development and Alumni Relations at the University of Miami. In March 2016, the University of Miami announced a hemispheric collaboration between CCS and the Yucatán State Government’s Information Technologies Innovation Center known as "Heuristic", located in the Yucatán Science and Technology Park. Taking that collaboration a step further, RAD Lab and CCS came together to design Zenciti, located adjacent to the Park. The donor, Urbetica, is driven by a deep passion to apply innovative technologies to everyday life, and wants the School of Architecture to utilize its innovative knowledge and creative thinking towards the advancement of the Zenciti living lab as a smart city platform and model for future smart cities. "At Zenciti we believe that the combined efforts of academia, businesses and government allows an industrial society to change into a knowledgeable society which in turn will transform the economic development of its cities and improve the life of its citizens," said Jorge Ivan Espadas Espinosa, CEO of Urbetica. "We believe that cities as centers of economic development have an enormous challenge and great opportunity to use technology to become more efficient, more sustainable, and to offer better service to its residents. Therefore, we feel great satisfaction in giving this donation to establish a fund to do research on designing a prototype for a smart city of the future. We are certain that the University of Miami’s School of Architecture is the right institution to channel its innovative knowledge and creativity in the research and design of smart cities platforms. We also congratulate the School’s decision to name the Smart Cities space the 'RAD Lab Zenciti Research Unit.'" _________________________ For additional information on Zenciti + U-SoA project, please visit:...

read more

Expanding the University of Miami’s Connective Network

Posted by on 10:34 am in News | Comments Off on Expanding the University of Miami’s Connective Network

Expanding the University of Miami’s Connective Network

Building upon its strategic objective to be the hemispheric university, the University of Miami Thursday opened a regional office in Mexico City, providing another gateway to Latin America to facilitate educational exchange, enhance research efforts, and convene and collaborate with top academic and health institutions throughout Mexico and Central America. “The U seeks to promote partnerships and two-way movement of students, researchers, and innovators,” UM President Julio Frenk said in announcing the new regional office. Frenk announced the opening of the office during a special showcase of Lo Mejor de la Universidad de Miami en México—The Best of the University of Miami in Mexico—at El Colegio Nacional in Mexico City. Addressing a distinguished group of 200 scholars, Frenk outlined the University’s vision for becoming the “hemispheric university,” including long-term plans for opening an additional four regional offices in strategic locations throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. “Our presence will allow us to deepen research collaboration, particularly in areas where UM researchers are already active, such as climate change, urbanization, public health and well-being, journalism, anthropology, and mathematics, among others,” Frenk said. The University celebrates its centennial in 2025, and during his tenure, Frenk has embraced the idea put forth by the University’s founders that the University of Miami is perfectly geographically positioned to be a Pan-American university. Located at the crossroads of the Americas in one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world, a hemispheric mission involves not only bringing the world to the U but in bringing the University to the world. Opening a regional office in the Roma Norte district of Mexico City—the most populous city in North America in a country with the region’s second largest economy—establishes a UM footprint that will focus on four major areas: educational exchange and mobility, research, technology innovation, and healthcare. “The University is focused on building connective bridges across the globe, and the regional office in Mexico City is a tremendous first step to enriching the experience of not only our own students and faculty but those from across the region,” said Lourdes Dieck-Assad, vice president for hemispheric and global affairs. Since launching the Office of Hemispheric and Global Affairs in 2017, Dieck-Assad has been working with UM schools, colleges, and centers of excellence to identify opportunities and promote hemispheric and global interactions in research, education, and service. In 2018, she led an initiative to establish a Hemispheric University Consortium, currently based at UM and embraced by leaders from 14 initial universities in Latin America, the Caribbean, Canada, and the U.S. The consortium is committed to facilitating problem-based alliances in education and research to generate the knowledge and solutions necessary to confront the key challenges facing not only the hemisphere but globally. On Thursday evening, more than 150 special guests, including UM alumni, friends, and representatives of the administration and faculty attended the formal inauguration of the new office. Henning Jensen-Pennington, president of the University of Costa Rica and one of the academic leaders who signed the consortium agreement, spoke at the event celebrated UM’s vision in promoting this level of collaboration among universities in the hemisphere. “Today more than ever before, universities must unite and promote spaces for interchanges that are interdisciplinary and span borders," he said. "The closer we can align ourselves, the more agile and expansive our efforts and responses...

read more
CCS
Skip to toolbar