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CCS presents poster at San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 12/6-10/16

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CCS presents poster at San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 12/6-10/16

This Symposium is designed to provide state-of-the-art information on the experimental biology, etiology, prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of breast cancer and premalignant breast disease, to an international audience of academic and private physicians and researchers involved in breast cancer in medical, surgical, gynecologic, and radiation oncology, as well as to other appropriate health care professionals. The scientific program consists of plenary lectures and mini-symposia by experts in clinical and basic research; selected slide and poster presentations chosen from the submitted abstracts; educational sessions, award lectures, panel and case discussions and forums.  One of the poster presentations will be "Genome-wide identification of transcripts regulated by estrogen in MCF-7 cells using BrU-seq." by J. Sun, Marc E. Lippman, and CCS's Camilo Valdes, Enrico Capobianco, and Nicholas Tsinoremas.   Citation:  Sun, C. Valdes, E. Capobianco, N. Tsinoremas, M.E. Lippman. Genome-wide identification of transcripts regulated by estrogen in MCF-7 cells using BrU-seq. San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Poster. Dec 6-10,...

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Pizza Seminar Series on Using Data Ensembles Wednesday 11/30/2016

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Pizza Seminar Series on Using Data Ensembles Wednesday 11/30/2016

This is another in the Department of Computer Science Pizza Seminar Series.   "Exploring the Potential of Data Depth for Uncertainty Characterization and Visualization of Ensembles"   Wednesday, November 30th 2016, 5:00 p.m., UB230 by Dr. Mahsa Mirzargar, Department of Computer Science, University of Miami.   When computational models or predictive simulations are used, researchers, analysts and decision makers are not only interested in understanding the data but also interested in understanding the uncertainty present in the data as well. In such situations, using ensembles is a common approach to account for the uncertainty, and explore the possible outcomes of a model. Visualization as an integral component of data-analysis task can significantly facilitate the communication of the characteristics of an ensemble including uncertainty information. In this talk, I will introduce novel ensemble visualization paradigms based on the generalization of conventional univariate boxplots and the concept of data depth. Generalizations of boxplot provide an intuitive yet rigorous approach to studying variability and descriptive features of an ensemble. The nonparametric nature of this type of analysis makes it an advantageous approach to study uncertainty in various applications ranging from image analysis to fluid simulation to weather and climate modeling. Refreshments will be served beforehand at 4:30 p.m. in the reception area of the 3rd floor of the Ungar building, 1365 Memorial Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 ( map/directions...

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iNeuro: Preparing a workforce for the Big Data Tsunami, Will Grisham TALK 1/6/17

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iNeuro: Preparing a workforce for the Big Data Tsunami, Will Grisham TALK 1/6/17

Computational data analysis skills have crossed over from niche to mainstream. Join us Friday, January 6, 2017,  from 12:00 to 1:00 PM in the Lois Pope 7th floor auditorium, for a seminar by William Grisham, formerly at NSF and currently at UCLA, who developed the iNeuro Project, an effort to prepare a workforce to meet the challenge of large-scale data in neuroscience. LOCATION Lois Pope Life Center, 1095 NW 14th Terrace (map), Miami, FL 33136.  Click here for directions & parking. If you are interested in lunch with the speaker, please email CCS Director of Engagement, Athina Hadjixenofontos at ahadjixenofontos@miami.edu by January 3rd with “Grisham Seminar” in the subject line.   This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Neuroscience and the Center for Computational Science.          ...

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BIG DATA Lunch & Learn with Zongjun Hu, PhD, Thursday 12/01/16

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BIG DATA Lunch & Learn with Zongjun Hu, PhD, Thursday 12/01/16

Process Big Data on Bigfoot Hadoop Cluster: Load and Query Speaker  Zongjun Hu, PhD, Lead, Big Data, UM CCS Advanced Computing Thursday, 12/01/2016, 12:00-1:00 PM  |  Light lunch will be provided:  Please RSVP to ccsadministration@miami.edu. Location  Coral Gables Campus MEA202, McArthur Engineering Annex, 1251 Memorial Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (map/directions). Abstract   Relational Database Manage System (RDBMS) had been a perfect solution for data warehouse and analytics. However the skyrocketing big data is changing the market significantly. The traditional technologies cannot keep up with the big data. Majority of the data is generated from wide range of sources and it is no longer structured data only. Its volume has gone way beyond the capability of RDBMS. It also has been generated in very high velocity, which basically cannot be handled by traditional technologies.   CCS Advanced Computing has developed a new big data platform ready for university faculty, staff, and students. The Bigfoot Hadoop cluster has made big data collection and processing possible. It provides user friendly interfaces to allow users to load, process, and query big data easily and efficiently. In this lunch-and-learn session, Dr. Zongjun Hu will first introduce several big data technologies behind the interfaces, and then demonstrate the general procedures to communicate with the cluster and utilize it for big data discovery research.   This event is open to: UM Faculty, Staff, and Students.  ...

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CCS Member Ge-Cheng Zha receives DARPA award for Aviation Transports

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CCS Member Ge-Cheng Zha receives DARPA award for Aviation Transports

A research grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) could help a University of Miami College of Engineering professor transform the aviation industry. Dr. Ge-Cheng Zha, a professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering with the CoE, and a CCS Member, received a DARPA grant to conduct research including numerical simulation, design, and wind tunnel testing to further demonstrate the superior co-flow jet (CFJ) airfoil performance for extremely short takeoffs and landings, and ultra-high-transonic cruise efficiency. The CFJ active-flow-control airfoil has an injection slot near the leading edge and a suction slot near the trailing edge on the airfoil upper surface. A small amount of mass flow is withdrawn into the airfoil slot near the trailing edge on the upper surface, pressurized and energized by a micro-compressor actuator inside the airfoil, and then injected near the LE in the direction tangent to the main flow on the upper surface. It can dramatically increase lift and generate thrust (like a bird wing) at very low energy expenditure. Dr. Zha and his team have conducted the research on CFJ airfoil at UM for the past 13 years, using wind-tunnel testing and advanced computing provided by CCS. In recent research, based on high fidelity CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulation at low speed, the team has obtained a maximum lift coefficient of 9.6 at an angle of attack of 70º with no stall (see figure). The lift coefficient is substantially greater than the theoretical limit of the maximum lift coefficient of 7.6. It is thus named super-lift coefficient. At the same time, the team’s CFD simulation shows that the CFJ airfoil is able to increase productivity efficiency by 36% for a supercritical transonic airfoil at cruise. Most of the current active flow control technologies are aimed at suppressing airfoil-flow separation at a high angle of attack. The CFJ airfoil appears to be uniquely able to increase transonic airfoil efficiency at cruise when the flow is benign at a low angle of attack. These findings have the potential to transform the next generation of military and civil transports with extremely short takeoff/landing distances to increase airport capacity, reduce noise, and to reduce fuel consumption and emission pollution due to the ultra-high cruise efficiency. This is a joint project between UM, Texas A&M University, and Florida State University.  “We are excited about this deep collaboration, and the insight and understanding to revolutionize the aerospace industry through innovative technology and research,” Zha said. “We are researching, inventing, and testing future aerospace technology, which will, we hope, make this world better.” The one-year DARPA seeding grant totals approximately $960,000. Zha’s proposal was titled, “ESTOL (Extremely Short Takeoff and Landing) Performance for Heavy Lift Transports Using Ultra High Lift High efficiency Co Flow Jet Airfoil.”     SOURCE: College of Engineering website  Transforming Aviation Transports | DARPA Awards Research Grant to Dr. Ge-Cheng Zha for Future Aviation Transports SEE ALSO: UM eVertias article  Center for Green Aviation to Focus on Electric Planes In this video (from 2009), Dr. Zha, inventor of the flying wing, talks about the Future of Flight. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4fUMqvtBRI...

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MICROSOFT profiles CCS Visualization Director Alberto Cairo in “Show, don’t tell”

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MICROSOFT profiles CCS Visualization Director Alberto Cairo in “Show, don’t tell”

Thomas Kohnstamm's interview is entitled "Show, don't tell: Alberto Cairo, Power BI & the rise of data journalism" (what is Power BI).  This comes on the heels of his event (the first) Digital Humanities + Data Journalism Symposium, held September 29-October 1, 2016, here at UM. Kohnstamm's article illuminates the history of Visualization as visualizations themselves help to illuminate the rise of this fascinating approach. "Visualization no longer just complements a written story. It is the story. In our increasingly data-driven world, visualization is becoming an essential tool for journalists from national papers to blogs with a staff of one." This in-depth interview takes a look at how big data has infiltrated everyday life, Cairo's parallel career, and how he "stumbled" into infographics: "His career has tracked alongside the major technological developments in and out of the newsroom that brought us to the current point in data visualization." Prof. Cairo came to the University of Miami in January of 2012. In December 2014, he was named the "Knight Chair in Visual Journalism" for 2015, a five to seven year term that aims to "[maintain] a cutting-edge relationship to the developing professions of visual journalism by fostering projects and experiments that will incubate new techniques of visual and interactive reporting and storytelling." From the Microsoft article, Prof. Cairo says "Miami is unrivaled at teaching data visualization." "Graphics are mandatory for journalism students here and we have deep coursework in infographics, visualization, cartography, 3D modeling and advanced programming—all related to journalism." Read more at: news.microsoft.com/stories/data  |  Join us at the next CCS Visualization program event, the "VizUM 3rd Annual Symposium".   Visit  ccs.miami.edu/focus-area/visualization...

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Lunch & Learn on Internet of Things & Sensor Networks | Joel Zysman TODAY 11/9/16

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Lunch & Learn on Internet of Things & Sensor Networks | Joel Zysman TODAY 11/9/16

Internet of Things (IoT) and Sensor Networks at UM (What is IoT and what do I do with it?)   Speaker: Joel P. Zysman, Director of Advanced Computing Wednesday, 11/9/2016, 12:00-1:00 PM  |  Light lunch will be provided:  Please RSVP to ccsadministration@miami.edu. Location Gables Campus MEA220, McArthur Engineering Annex, 1251 Memorial Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (map/directions) The Internet of Things has become a buzzword in both the research community and popular parlance in recent times. From Smart Cities to internet-connected appliances, the Internet of Things has implications well beyond the technological and engineering fields. In this session of the CCS Lunch and Learn series, please join Joel P. Zysman to learn about current IoT based projects hosted at the University of Miami and the various data services available to the UM research community in support of sensor networks. This event is open to: UM Faculty, Staff, and Students.  ...

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Viz UM 3rd Annual Symposium 11/10/16 features Colin Ware & Martin Krzywinski

Posted by on 8:34 am in Events - Past, Lectures & Seminars - Archived, News - Archived, VizUM Events - Archived, Workshops - Archived | Comments Off on Viz UM 3rd Annual Symposium 11/10/16 features Colin Ware & Martin Krzywinski

Viz UM 3rd Annual Symposium 11/10/16 features Colin Ware & Martin Krzywinski

The Viz UM 3rd Annual Symposium will be held on Thursday, November 10, 2016 from 4:00-7:00 PM at the University of Miami Newman Alumni Center, 6200 San Amaro Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146.  Our guests speakers are Colin Ware and Martin Krzywinski. REGISTER FOR FREE: http://tiny.cc/14dpfy   COLIN WARE   Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping   |  University of New Hampshire Colin Ware specializes in applying theories of perception to the design visualizations. He has advanced degrees in both computer science (MMath, Waterloo) and in the psychology of perception (PhD,Toronto). He has published over 160 scientific articles in the fields of data visualization and human-computer interaction. His book Information Visualization: Perception for Design is now in its third edition.  His book, Visual Thinking for Design, appeared in 2008. Ware also likes to build practical visualization systems. Fledermaus, a commercial 3D geospatial visualization system widely used in oceanography, was developed from his initial prototypes. His trackPlot software is being used by marine mammal scientists and his flowVis2D software is serving images on NOAA websites. Ware is Director of the Data Visualization Research Lab which is part of the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New Hampshire.   Visual Thinking about Scientific Data:  The Cognitive Processes Whereby we Gain Knowledge Visual thinking is a process.  We do not just take in information “at a glance”; rather, what we perceive depends on what information we are seeking and the visual system is tuned accordingly.  This is especially true when we are doing science. The scientist uses visualizations as a tool to confirm and refute hypothesis, present results, gain new insights into data, and occasionally make new discoveries.  Each of these entails a different thinking processes. In this talk we will trace how the thread of cognition depends on the task as well as the perceptual issues that determine if a visualization is successful. Examples will range from weather displays and tools to help scientists understand the tracks of sea lions as they forage off the coast of California.     MARTIN KRZYWINSKI   Canada’s Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre  |  British Columbia Cancer Agency Martin Krzywinski is known for his work in bioinformatics and data visualization. He created the Circos graph to display genomic data sets in a way that revealed their inner structure and served as a visually stunning emblem of the new field. His information graphics have appeared in the New York Times, Wired, Scientific American and covers of numerous books and scientific journals. Krzywinski’s work has set a new standard for the presentation of scientific results and established design as a tool of discovery in the research process itself.   Fitting Big Science on a Small Page An exhaustive explanation is an exhausting one. My own goal is to leave the audience energized and motivated to continue to conversation, which should flow naturally beyond the scope of the design. They can always ask for more but they cannot ask for less. Assuming that a design will act as a first explanation motivates me for the need to distinguish essentials from ever-present modifiers and merely interesting tangents. While everything may indeed be important, initially some things are more important than others. Classifying aspects of the science this way always feels risky—how do I know that I know enough to justify leaving...

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Researchers Go High-Tech to Explore the Social World of Children

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Researchers Go High-Tech to Explore the Social World of Children

Remember your earliest friends from preschool? Researchers from the University of Miami want to know how those friendships formed, and they plan to do just that through a $200,000+ grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF Award Abstract #1052736), and a nifty device that will track the movements of children at two UM centers in real time for four years. “We know that early social experiences in the classroom impact later development and learning,” said Dr. Daniel Messinger (pictured at left), Director of the CCS Social Systems Informatics Program, and a Psychology Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences. “Yet, we really don’t know how those social networks form. The whole point of this project is to learn what kids are doing moment-to-moment, hour-to-hour, month-to-month, and year-to-year in the classroom.” While child psychologists have observed classroom behavior in the past, research was always limited by the frequency and accuracy of the observations. Now, explains Messinger, researchers can harness technology to detect and record children’s movements throughout the day. Worn like a wristwatch, the data-tracking device gathers large amounts of data that UM researchers will analyze to ask how children’s social networks in early childhood change moment-to-moment and over several years.   The collection and analysis of this big data is possible through an interdisciplinary collaboration between the departments of psychology and physics in the College of Arts and Sciences. “This is another exciting example of what the college has made possible through its support of complex systems science,” said physicist Dr. Neil Johnson (pictured at right). “I do not know of any other interdisciplinary project that involves psychology and physics working so closely together.”   The movement-tracking devices will be worn by children from The Debbie School at the UM Mailman Center for Child Development, which offers education services for children who are deaf and hard of hearing from birth through the second or third grade, and the Linda Ray Intervention Center, a Department of Psychology program that serves newborn to 3-year-old children who are developmentally delayed as a result of abuse, neglect, or prenatal exposure to drugs. Dr. Lynne Katz (pictured at left), research associate professor and director of the Linda Ray Intervention Center, says the research will not only assist psychologists who study children’s behaviors, but help teachers understand the inner workings of how children play, who they play with, where they play, and where maximum learning and maximum language output occurs. “At Linda Ray, we are going to see how we can best put this study into place,” adds Katz. “The children are very young, and we need to get them comfortable with wearing the data-tracking devices.”   Kathleen Vergara, director of the Debbie School, said she is excited about the study and its focus on children with hearing loss at the school, which will “lead to the development of important interventions for this population.” The study is expected to take four years to complete and will follow children from toddler to pre-kindergarten age.   by Deserae E. del Campo  |  Special to UM...

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CCS Center Director Nick Tsinoremas speaks at UF Informatics Institute

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CCS Center Director Nick Tsinoremas speaks at UF Informatics Institute

Big Data Approaches and Applications for Biomedical Data – Dr. Nicholas Tsinoremas October 13 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm | CTRB Room 361, Clinical and Translational Science Building, 2004 Mowry Road, Gainesville, FL 32610   + Google Map Dr. Tsinoremas will provide an overview of the University of Miami Center for Computational Science (UM CCS), along with a brief description of its seven scientific programs and two technology platforms. UM CCS is a University wide initiative focuses on problem solving approaches to societal problems where computing, informatics and team approaches play a significant and integral role. The Center is involved in over 150+ University wide research projects at any given time, ranging from bioinformatics, big data in health care, drug discovery informatics, large mapping projects, climate change and environmental hazards, to architectural design, business analytics, digital humanities and visualization. A few example projects in Bioinformatics and Biomedical Informatics will be discussed in more detail as well as highlight of new innovative Big Data approaches to HealthCare. Bio Dr. Nicholas Tsinoremas holds faculty appointments at the Miller School of Medicine and the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Miami (UM) and is the Founding Director for the University of Miami Center for Computational Science. Dr. Tsinoremas is an international leader in computational genomics and bioinformatics, and brings over 25 years of academic and industrial experience to UM. He received his B.A. in Chemistry from the University of Athens, Greece, and his Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of Leeds, UK. Before joining the University of Miami, he served as Senior Director of Informatics at The Scripps Research Institute-Florida. There, he recruited and managed the Informatics and IT groups for the newly formed Scripps Florida. As Director of Computational Genomics and Genomic Discovery at Rosetta/Merck where he directed the project that combined informatics and computational approaches with gene expression profiling and genetics to discover, prioritize, and define drug target genes. Prior to working for Merck/Rosetta, Tsinoremas was the Vice-President of Genomics at DoubleTwist Inc., where he determined the scientific direction of DoubleTwist’s bioinformatics applications and...

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