News & Events



HOME  orange arrow  News & Events

2-Day Software Carpentry-Python Workshop 11/14-15/2018 Gables Campus

Posted by on 2:24 pm in Events - Past, News - Archived, Workshops - Archived | Comments Off on 2-Day Software Carpentry-Python Workshop 11/14-15/2018 Gables Campus

2-Day Software Carpentry-Python Workshop 11/14-15/2018 Gables Campus

Register Now This Bash, Python, and git workshop is capped at 24 participants, and is on a first-come/ first-served basis. If you are looking to make yourself competitive in the job market If you want to take a personal project to the next level If you are interested in learning programming for data analysis Then, this workshop is for you. Our trained instructors will lead you through a comprehensive, hands-on overview of an introductory data analysis using Python. We will cover topics like data types, functions, conditional statements, loops, errors and exceptions, debugging, and some key Python libraries and writing Python programs that will work like Linux command-line tools. This workshop is designed to provide a foundation of basic concepts that all programming depends on, using Python as an example. WHEN Wednesday and Thursday, 11/14-15/2018 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM WHERE Richter Library, Learning Commons Flexible Program Space (1st Floor), Gables Campus NOTE: Bring your own laptop (any OS).   ____________________ This 2-day workshop will provide you with the basic computing skills and best practices needed to be productive in a small research team. The format is a mixture of short seminars and hands-on practical exercises, and participants are encouraged to help one another, and to try applying what they have learned to their own research problems during and between sessions.   Instructors:  Nick O'Neill, PhD student in Neuroscience |  Tim Norris, PhD, Research Data Scientist   Getting Started - Setup To participate in a Software Carpentry workshop, you will need access to the software described below (Bash Shell, Git, and Python). In addition, you will need an up-to-date web browser. We maintain a list of common issues that occur during installation as a reference for instructors that may be useful on the Configuration Problems and Solutions wiki page. The Bash Shell Bash is a commonly-used shell that gives you the power to do simple tasks more quickly. Windows Video Tutorial Download the Git for Windows installer. Run the installer and follow the steps bellow: Click on "Next". Click on "Next". Keep "Use Git from the Windows Command Prompt" selected and click on "Next". If you forgot to do this programs that you need for the workshop will not work properly. If this happens rerun the installer and select the appropriate option. Click on "Next". Keep "Checkout Windows-style, commit Unix-style line endings" selected and click on "Next". Keep "Use Windows' default console window" selected and click on "Next". Click on "Install". Click on "Finish". If your "HOME" environment variable is not set (or you don't know what this is): Open command prompt (Open Start Menu then type cmd and press [Enter]) Type the following line into the command prompt window exactly as shown:setx HOME "%USERPROFILE%" Press [Enter], you should see SUCCESS: Specified value was saved. Quit command prompt by typing exit then pressing [Enter] This will provide you with both Git and Bash in the Git Bash program. macOS The default shell in all versions of macOS is Bash, so no need to install anything. You access Bash from the Terminal (found in/Applications/Utilities). See the Git installation video tutorial for an example on how to open the Terminal. You may want to keep Terminal in your dock for this workshop. Linux The default shell is usually Bash, but if...

read more

VizUM 2018 and Inaugural VizUM Visualization Competition 11/15/18

Posted by on 2:23 pm in Events - Past, News - Archived, VizUM Events - Archived | Comments Off on VizUM 2018 and Inaugural VizUM Visualization Competition 11/15/18

VizUM 2018 and Inaugural VizUM Visualization Competition 11/15/18

VizUM 2018 | 11/15/18 VizUM 2018 has been scheduled for Thursday, November 15, 2018, 4:00-7:00 PM. The finalists' projects from the inaugural VizUM Visualization Competition will be presented. REGISTER NOW  Free  |  Event Announcement If you plan to attend and need FREE PARKING, please register your vehicle. Those with UM parking permits do not need to register (your vehicle is already in the system and you may park in the grey zones). Speakers   Bongshin Lee | Microsoft Bongshin Lee is a Senior Researcher in the Human-Computer Interaction and EPIC research groups at Microsoft Research. She explores innovative ways to enable people to create visualizations, interact with their data, and share data-driven stories. Recently, she has been recently on helping people collect and explore data about themselves, and, share insights with others by leveraging visualizations. Bongshin currently serve as a Papers Co-Chair for PacificVis 2018 and as Associate Editor for IEEE TVCG. She served as a General Co-Chair for IEEE PacificVis 2017, and Papers Co-Chair for IEEE InfoVis 2015 and 2016. She earned her MS and PhD in Computer Science from University of Maryland at College Park in 2002 and 2006, respectively. For more information, please visit bongshiny.com. Hadley Wickham | RStudio Hadley Wickham is a Chief Scientist at RStudio, and an Adjunct Professor of Statistics at the University of Auckland, Stanford University, and Rice University. Hadley builds tools (computational and cognitive) that make data science easier, faster, and more fun. He's from New Zealand but he currently lives in Houston, TX with his partner and two dogs. Most of Hadley's work is in the form of open source R code, which you can find on github.com/hadley. You can roughly divide his work into three categories: tools for data science, tools for data import, and software engineering tools. hadley.nz   Flyer | Poster...

read more

Cleaning Data with OpenRefine & Excel Workshop 11/29-30/2018 Gables Campus

Posted by on 9:24 am in Events - Past, News - Archived, Workshops - Archived | Comments Off on Cleaning Data with OpenRefine & Excel Workshop 11/29-30/2018 Gables Campus

Cleaning Data with OpenRefine & Excel Workshop 11/29-30/2018 Gables Campus

Register Now Open to UM Faculty/Staff/Students This workshop introduces participants to techniques for cleaning and transforming data with OpenRefine and Microsoft Excel. Sometimes datasets are created by multiple individuals, and/or created without a clear set of guidelines. The resulting datasets may be difficult to analyze because they lack standardization (i.e., New York City may be listed as “NYC,” “New York, NY”, “New York City”, and “New York City, NY”). In this workshop, participants will learn how to quickly and efficiently find standardization issues and other errors, and how to correct them in bulk, as well as how to enhance existing datasets by adding new metadata fields. When Thursday and Friday, November 29-30, 2018 8:30 AM Registration  | 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Course Hours, Both Days Where UM Coral Gables campus Day 1 College of Engineering, McArthur Engineering Annex, Room #MEA 202 Day 2 Richter Library Learning Commons Flexible Programming Space (1st Floor), Room #102-B   Note: Please bring your own laptop (any OS).     Instructors:  Cameron Riopelle, PhD, Data Services Librarian  |  Paige Morgan PhD, Digital Scholarship Librarian and Scholarly Publishing Officer   SPONSORS                                          ...

read more

“Connections, Connections: Student Research in Social Systems @ UM” 9/21

Posted by on 10:25 am in Engagement, Events - Past, Lectures & Seminars - Archived, News - Archived | Comments Off on “Connections, Connections: Student Research in Social Systems @ UM” 9/21

“Connections, Connections: Student Research in Social Systems @ UM” 9/21

A Flash Talks and Networking Symposium Friday, September 21, 2018 | 4:00-6:00 PM Ungar Building, Room 230C-D | RSVP Now It is a pleasure to invite you to Connections, Connections: Student Research in Social Systems @ UM, organized by the Center for Computational Science. Social informatics includes modeling big behavioral data to understand human and non-human social interaction. Students working in psychology, education, geography, public health, or architecture; students studying sociality in model organisms; or students working on method development through computer science, mathematics, physics and engineering, may fall under the Social Systems Informatics umbrella. This event offers an opportunity for post-doc, graduate (and advanced undergraduate) students across campuses to connect, share their research, and network with each other and with invited faculty. Agenda Ice breaker Five-minute student flash talks (6x) Networking   Guide for Presenters We are calling all students who would like to present a flash talk. Presentations are maximum 5 minutes, followed by up to 5 minutes of questions. You may prepare a slide deck with a maximum of 5 slides. If interested in attending or presenting, please register. Important dates for presenters: 9/14 Deadline to Register to be a Presenter 9/19 Presentation Slides Submission Deadline 9/21 Date of Presentation For any questions regarding the event, please contact us at ccsengagement@miami.edu   We look forward to seeing you at Connections, Connections: Student Research in Social Systems @ UM.  This event is free and open to UM Faculty, Staff, and Students. Location The Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy Arthur A. Ungar Building, Room 230C-D 1365 Memorial Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146          ...

read more

Notification: /scratch and /projects may be intermittently unavailable . . .

Posted by on 9:23 am in News - Archived | Comments Off on Notification: /scratch and /projects may be intermittently unavailable . . .

Notification:  /scratch and /projects may be intermittently unavailable . . .

Attention All Pegasus Users:  /scratch and /projects may be intermittently unavailable until further notice due to problems with the storage controllers. We are aware of the situation and are working on resolving the issues. We will send updates as more information is known. As always, if you have any questions or problems, please contact us by sending email to: hpc@ccs.miami.edu....

read more

“Fundamentals of Java Programming” by Mitsu Ogihara now available

Posted by on 10:26 am in News - Archived | Comments Off on “Fundamentals of Java Programming” by Mitsu Ogihara now available

“Fundamentals of Java Programming” by Mitsu Ogihara now available

 Fundamentals of Java Programming by CCS Big Data Analytics & Data Mining Program Director Mitsunori Ogihara is now available in hardback. Making extensive use of examples, Fundamentals of Java Programming teaches the fundamental skills for getting started in a command-line environment. Meant to be used for a one-semester course to build solid foundations in Java, the textbook eschews second-semester content to concentrate on over 180 code examples and 250 exercises. Key object classes (String, Scanner, PrintStream, Arrays, and File) are included to get started. The programs are explained with almost line-by-line descriptions, also with chapter-by-chapter coding exercises. Teaching resources include solutions to the exercises, as well as digital lecture slides.   About the Author Mitsu Ogihara is a professor of Computer Science at the University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL. Prior to joining the UM, he was a professor of Computer Science at the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. He is presently an editor of Theory of Computing Systems (Springer), International Journal of Foundations of Computer Science (World Scientific Press), and Open Computer Science Journal (De Gruyter). He has published three books: A Complexity Theory Companion (Springer), Music Data Mining (CRC Press), and Fukuzatsusa no KaisoÌ in Japanese. He has published more than 190 research...

read more

Join us for the 2018-2019 CCS Fellows’ Launch Symposium 8/16/18

Posted by on 3:40 pm in Events - Past, News - Archived | Comments Off on Join us for the 2018-2019 CCS Fellows’ Launch Symposium 8/16/18

Join us for the 2018-2019 CCS Fellows’ Launch Symposium 8/16/18

The vision of the Center for Computational Science’s “CCS Fellows Program” is to inspire a new generation of leaders in computational science to cross the traditional boundaries between disciplines, by equipping them with new cross-disciplinary skills and experience. The Program does this by offering mentorship outside the students’ area of expertise. “CCS Fellow” is a prestigious designation awarded to two undergraduate students and two graduate students per year. Join us on Thursday, August 16, 2018, 3:00-5:00 PM, at Gables One Tower, for the 2018-2019 CCS Fellows' project launch presentations. This event is free and open to interested UM Faculty/Staff/Students.  Refreshments will be served. Please RSVP Location Gables One Tower, Training Room 639, 1320 S Dixie Hwy, Coral Gables, FL 33146  |  Map | Directions   Meet the CCS Fellows:   Yeo Jin "Amy" Ahn Project  Automating and Accelerating the Autism Diagnostic Process Mentors Mitsunori Ogihara, PhD | Dept. of Computer Science and CCS Daniel S. Messinger, PhD  |  Professor of Psychology Amy is a PhD student in Psychology. She graduated with honors from Cornell University with a B.S. in Human Development and a concentration in Social and Personality Development. She joined the Early Play and Development Lab in fall of 2017. She is interested in infants' and young children's social interaction and how it relates to typical and atypical social and emotional development. She aims to better understand children's social behaviors by implementing objective measurement. Steven Anderson Project  Virtual Reality Simulations of Dyadic Medical Interactions Mentors Mitsunori Ogihara, PhD | Dept. of Computer Science and CCS Elizabeth Reynolds Losin, PhD  |  Department of Psychology - Health Division Steven is a PhD student working under the supervision of Dr. Elizabeth Losin in the Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Division in the Department of Psychology. He received his Bachelor of Liberal Arts in Psychology from Harvard University Extension School. Prior to joining the Social and Cultural Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Miami, Steven worked on developing behavioral health interventions for patients with chronic medical conditions at a healthcare technology company. His doctoral research centers on identifying sociocultural and contextual influences on pain perception in the self and others, with an applied focus on medical settings and the doctor-patient relationship. His research utilizes behavioral, neuroimaging, psychophysiological, and computational methods. Jin Yop "Stephano" Chang Project  Development of Closed-Loop Neuromodulation of Gait and Balance Control After Spinal Cord Injury Mentors Brian R. Noga, PhD and James D. Guest, MD PhD FACS FRCS (C) | The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis Odelia Schwartz, PhD  |  Department of Computer Science Stephano is a Neurosurgery resident pursuing his PhD in Neuroscience with Dr. Brian Noga and Dr. James Guest at the University of Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, combining his clinical background with his scientific interest in neuromodulation for spinal cord injury. During the CCS Fellows program, he hopes to apply a computational approach to optimize the application of neurostimulation technologies to restore function after injury. Samantha Mitsven Project  Objective Measurement of Language Development: An Investigation of Preschoolers' Networked Social Interactions Mentors TBA Daniel S. Messinger, PhD  |  Professor of Psychology Samantha received her B.A. in Psychology from San Diego State University in 2013 and worked as a Research Assistant and Lab Manager in cognitive and neuroimaging labs at UC Davis and Stanford University following graduation. She is currently a second year PhD student in Developmental Psychology working...

read more

Ben Kirtman Named American Meterological Society Fellow

Posted by on 4:41 pm in News | Comments Off on Ben Kirtman Named American Meterological Society Fellow

Ben Kirtman Named American Meterological Society Fellow

CCS Director of Climate & Environmental Hazards program and RSMAS Professor Ben Kirtman is named 2019 fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) for his outstanding contributions to weather, water, and climate. He will be recognized during the AMS Annual Meeting on January 9-11, 2019, in Phoenix Arizona. Kirtman, who has been at the UM Rosenstiel School for over 10 years, is a professor of Atmospheric Sciences and director of the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS).   “This long overdue recognition for Ben reflects his status in our professional society and brings prestige to him, our School and our University,” said Dean of the UM Rosenstiel School Roni Avissar. Kirtman is a climate modeler who uses complex Earth system models to investigate the predictability of the climate system on time scales from days to decades and to study the influence of tropical variability on mid-latitude predictability. His research is wide-ranging and designed to understand and quantify the limits of climate predictability from days to decades, including understanding how the climate will change in response to changes in man-made and natural forcing. He was one of the first to develop an El Niño/La Niña prediction system using sophisticated climate models and currently leads a team of government laboratory researchers, academicians, and operational climate forecasters in developing the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) prediction system. This new prediction system has been issuing forecasts in real-time since August 2011, and was instrumental in predicting continuing La Niña conditions in the tropical Pacific and the associated impact on climate around the globe. The NMME became an official NOAA operational system in May 2016. The author of more than 120 peer-reviewed publications, Kirtman was also a coordinating lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report and is a member of several national and international scientific panels and working groups. Kirtman joins UM Rosenstiel School professors and current AMS fellows Brian Soden, Amy Clement, Lynn “Nick” Shay, Roni Avissar, and Bruce Albrecht. Founded in 1919, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) is the nation’s premier scientific and professional organization promoting and disseminating information about the atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrologic sciences. Our more than 13,000 members include researchers, educators, students, enthusiasts, broadcasters and other professionals in weather, water, and climate.   SOURCE:  UM News & Events Rosenstiel School Professor Named American Meterological Society...

read more

UM CCS Accelerates Life Sciences: A DDN Storage Success Story

Posted by on 10:09 am in News | Comments Off on UM CCS Accelerates Life Sciences: A DDN Storage Success Story

UM CCS Accelerates Life Sciences: A DDN Storage Success Story

ACCELERATE: LIFE SCIENCES A featured DDN Success Story, CCS Advanced Computing correlates viruses with gastrointestinal cancers for the cancer genome atlas 400% faster!     CHALLENGES • Diverse, interdisciplinary research projects required massive compute and storage power as well as integrated data lifecycle movement and management • Highly demanding I/O and heavy interactivity requirements from next-gen sequencing intensifi ed data generation, analysis and management • Powerful, flexible file system was required to handle large parallel jobs and smaller, shorter serial jobs • Data surges during analysis created “data-in-flight” challenges   SOLUTION An end-to-end, high performance DDN GRIDScaler® solution featuring a GS12K™ scale-out appliance with an embedded IBM® GPFS™ parallel file system   RESULTS • Links between certain viruses and gastrointestinal cancers discovered with computation not possible before • With DDN’s high performance I/O, CCS has reduced genomics compute and analysis time from 72 to 17 hours   BUSINESS BENEFITS • The ability to meet varied research workflow demands enables CCS to accelerate data analysis and speed scientific discoveries • Best-in-class performance for genomics assembly, alignment and mapping has proven invaluable in supporting major medical research into Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and gastrointestinal cancers • High performance storage and transparent data movement lets CCS scale storage without adding complexity   The University of Miami Center for Computational Science (CCS) maintains one of the largest centralized academic cyber infrastructures in the country, which is integral to addressing major scientific challenges, and solving many of today’s most challenging problems. Working with CCS, more than 2,000 researchers, faculty, staff, and students across multiple disciplines collaborate on diverse and interdisciplinary projects requiring Advanced Computing resources. CCS provides hardware, software development, and analytics expertise to support a variety of research areas, including: Genomics Computational Biology Marine Ecosystems Ocean Modeling Climate and Meteorology Computational Economics Computational fluid dynamics, and Social Systems Informatics. According to Dr. Nicholas Tsinoremas (CCS Center Director and Professor of Medicine, Computer Science, and Health Informatics), CCS was founded on the premise that data drives discovery. Therefore, keeping pace with data growth is of paramount importance. “Data-intensive discovery and multi-scale interdisciplinary approaches are becoming more prevalent in the way that sciences and engineering generate knowledge,” Nick explains. “The speed at which scientific disciplines advance, depends in large part on how effectively researchers collaborate with one another and with experts in the areas of workflow management, data management, data mining, decision support, visualization, and cloud computing.” Another guiding principle is the imperative to manage the entire data lifecycle as seamlessly as possible to streamline research workflow. “We have integrated the Advanced Computing environment with our data capture and analytics environments, so movement is transparent between different research steps,” Nick adds. “This level of interactive processing speeds the delivery of data from sensors and instruments to the desktop of analysts and ultimately, into the hands of science-based decision makers.”   THE CHALLENGE Unlike other advanced computing centers that originated as simulators, CCS has always put a lot of emphasis on data driving scientific results. Approximately 50% of the Center’s users come from UM’s Miller School of Medicine with ongoing projects at the John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics (such as research into Alzheimer’s disease), and The Miami Project To Cure Paralysis. The remaining 50% of users cover Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (RSMAS) as well as Engineering, along with...

read more

Notification: CCS Storage System Maintenance Begins 7/3 at 7 AM

Posted by on 9:30 am in News - Archived | Comments Off on Notification: CCS Storage System Maintenance Begins 7/3 at 7 AM

Notification:  CCS Storage System Maintenance Begins 7/3 at 7 AM

From 7:00 AM to 12:00 AM on Tuesday July 3rd, storage systems for the Pegasus compute cluster, Apollo, and VISX will undergo hardware maintenance. During this maintenance period, Pegasus batch execution and login nodes will be unavailable—as will the gateway (gw.ccs.miami.edu), Apollo, and VISX systems. We apologize for the inconvenience, and thank you for your understanding and cooperation. We will send out an all clear message once the work is done. As always, if you have any questions or problems, please contact us by sending email to: hpc@ccs.miami.edu....

read more
CCS
Skip to toolbar