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Computational Science is widely recognized as a critical means to solving many of today’s most challenging problems.  The analysis and knowledge gained from working with the incredible data explosion produced by massive experiments, observations and computer generated models is leading to solutions at an unimagined pace. Data-Intensive discovery (the fourth paradigm of scientific research), and Multi Scale Interdisciplinary  approaches are becoming more prevalent in the way that Science and Engineering is generating...

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N.O.T. Lands 1st Place in the 2019 Smart City Solutions Competition

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N.O.T. Lands 1st Place in the 2019 Smart City Solutions Competition

  The final presentations for the inaugural Design Your Coral Gables: Smart City Solutions Competition were held at eMerge Americas on Monday, April 29, 2019. The event was led by Joel Zysman, Director, CCS Advanced Computing, and Raimundo Rodulfo, Director, IT for the City of Coral Gables. This three-month Competition, officially launched in January at the 3rd annual Smart Cities MIAMI Conference yielded some great ideas. The Competition was designed in collaboration with the University of Miami School of Architecture,  the Center for Computational Science, and the City of Coral Gables. Winners were selected by a panel of expert judges based on the proposal’s interconnectivity, originality, transparency, sustainability, feasibility, impact, cost effectiveness, and interdisciplinarity.  The Competition panel of judges included: Rodolphe el-Khoury (Dean, UM School of Architecture and Director, Smart Cities program, UM CCS) Pamela Fuertes (Director, Economic Development, City of Coral Gables) Chris Mader (Director, Software Engineering, UM CCS) Nelson Gonzalez (Assistant Director, IT, City of Coral Gables) , and Matt Anderson (Sr. Sustainability Analyst, City of Coral Gables). FINALISTS The KAYROS team | Justo Vera-Ayesteran and Tupack Rhea | proposed UZIEL Charging Stations, addressing the need for public charging stations for electric vehicles.  Their presentation examined various citizen concerns such as: locating charging stations and available amenities while they wait. Their solution proposed leased, unattended, covered, modular charging stations with a smart floor, powered by solar panels that could also offset electrical costs during peak hours. The UZIEL charging stations would add a module to the existing City of Coral Gables mobile app, and could be grid-connected. The KAYROS team went on to earn 3rd place in the competition.   The SMART DAY CORAL GABLES team | Neil Schwam, Luis Carbonell, Elsa Mehary |  addressed the capitalization of existing data to identify patterns, using data directly from cell phones, as opposed to the Waze app that gets data from users.  This information would then be used for reverse marketing for City services.  This proposal landed the Smart Day Coral Gables team 2nd place in the competition.   THE LABORATORY OF EVERYDAY THINGS – N.O.T. (Neighborhood Oriented Transit) Team | Adib Cure, Rick Lopez, Chen  Mingyu, Teofilo Victoria, Rogelio Cadena, and Wang Jing | proposed combining existing local modes of transportation into one mobile app; providing users a schedule, service locations, and connections County-wide for services like:  Trolleys, Metrorail/Metromover, Hurry Canes Shuttle, Pedestrian Corridors, Bicycle Paths, County Bus Routes, County Shuttles, and the Free Bee. The Spin Scooters and Bikes data could also be incorporated into this mobile app.   Team POINCIANA II  | Zoheb Anjum, Andre Rivero-Guevara |  proposed the integration of Google traffic information with the County traffic lights controlling system.  The team connected with the Miami-Dade County Public Works and Waste Management office of Frank Aria, Chief, Traffic Signals and Signs Division to understand where the County is headed with transportation control, and what is current practice.  The team also explored what it would entail to have Coral Gables included in the management of this traffic lights/traffic flow.   First place went to The Laboratory of Everyday Things – N.O.T. Team. Winners earned a cash prize coupled with other prizes from the City of Coral Gables Parks and Recreation.  All participants will be celebrated and recognized at the Coral Gables City Commission meeting on May 14, 2019. Congratulations...

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Joseph Brancato to keynote Smart Cities MIAMI 2020

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Joseph Brancato to keynote Smart Cities MIAMI 2020

CCS and the School of Architecture are pleased to announce the Smart Cities MIAMI 2020 Keynote Speaker is Joseph Brancato, FAIA, NCARB, Vice Chairman, Gensler. Joe is a Managing Principal for Gensler’s Northeast and Latin America Regions, with offices in: New York; Morristown, NJ; Boston; Toronto; San José, Costa Rica; São Paulo; Mexico City; and Bogotá consisting of over 1,300 professionals. He is Vice Chairman of the firm’s Board of Directors, for which he sits on the Executive & Governance Committee and the Global Practice Committee. With vision and focus, Joe has led Gensler into new markets, providing leadership to the architecture, urban planning and design studios. He provides thought leadership and regularly speaks on topics such as the impact of driverless cars and ride-sharing on urban planning and development, designing futures cities, experience-driven design, and the urbanization of suburbia. Joe is also active in talent development and mentoring, having shaped Gensler’s gconnect program, which focuses on professional development for next-generation leaders in the firm. Engaged in professional outreach, he is an active member of the AIA (American Institute of Architects), NAIOP (National Association of Industrial and Office Properties), ULI (Urban Land Institute), Urban Design Forum, and CoreNet Global. He is a registered architect in 23 U.S. states and three Canadian provinces. Joe holds Bachelor Degrees in Architecture and Urban Studies from the University of Maryland. Save the date Tuesday, April 2, 2020 and join us on campus at the Jorge M. Perez Architecture Center....

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CCS Fellows’ Final Presentations Demonstrate Tech Skills and Remarkable Initiative

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CCS Fellows’ Final Presentations Demonstrate Tech Skills and Remarkable Initiative

The 2018-2019 CCS Fellows and their mentors gathered on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 at the Newman Alumni Center to make the final presentations on their chosen projects. 1 Presenting first was Steven Anderson, a PhD student working under the supervision of Dr. Elizabeth Losin in the Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Division in the Department of Psychology. Steven's project, titled “Virtual Reality Simulations of Dyadic Medical Interactions” looked at: Role playing combined with real-world conditions thorough VR to examine social factors that influence pain perception and pain report Correspondence between self report of pain and brain activity of pain, and Sociocultural and contextual modulations of pain perception. He delved into some background regarding known racial and ethnic biases in laparoscopic surgery (use of a machine), in the use of the new UM Simulation Hospital, and in prescribing medications, and set out to answer the following questions: Does VR simulating a medical environment enhance the realism and experience of receiving experimental pain stimulations? [STUDY 1 Undergrads view procedure while getting either pain or warmth. Does the VR modulate their perception?] Does demographic concordance between medical trainees and a VR patient influence pain-treatment-related outcomes? [STUDY 2 Pain Treatment Decisions] Tech Steven said at first he was going to write a review paper, but then he realized it was going to be possible to create something using Unity (a cross-platform real-time game engine). For the tech aspects, he taught himself how to Use Unity (C++/written in C#), then used Google Cardboard VCR glasses (with a phone), and moved up to an Oculus Go untethered device (comes with a wand/cannot navigate in 3D space/just used for viewing). Possible Collaborators interested in studying chronic pain:  Karuna AVR, applied VP.com, Magic Leap, UM Simulation Hospital (simulated setting/real-world impact) (looking at VR escalating the level of simulations), Social and Cultural Neuroscience Laboratory (aka Losin Lab). Affect contributing . . . neurological markers?   2 The second presenter was Jin Yop "Stephano" Chang with his project on the “Development of Closed-Loop Neuromodulation of Gait and Balance Control After Spinal Cord Injury”. Stephano is interested in neuromodulation strategies to restore gait function after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) in a large, translationally-relevant animal model. His interest in computational science regarding this research was in finding a way to implement balance control into his neuromodulation. Tech:  Stephano used Arduino hardware and code to develop a wireless, portable, and accurate inertial measurement unit. Using a quarternion-based system, he was able to characterize normal and perturbed states in the animal’s gait cycle. Using a Proportional-Integral-Derivative Control model, he developed an algorithm to correct for perturbations detected by the inertial measurement unit, which will be implemented through a custom-designed electrode. Q& A Stephano's inertial measurement unit was created with ope-source Arduino hardware. He also built a treadmill and speedometer for his experiments using Arduino. Collaborators/Acknowledgements The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis; Neurosurgery Research and Education Foundation; members of James Guest,'s lab:  Andrea Santamaria, Pedro Pinheiro; members of Brian Noga's lab: Ioan Opris, Luz Villamil, Franciso Sanchez, as well as Juan Solano, Yohjan Nuñez, and José Rodriguez   3 On the topic of ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder, the third presenter Yeo Jin "Amy" Ahn's project was titled  “Automating and Accelerating the Autism Diagnostic Process.” Opening with the shocking 2018 statistic that 1 in 59 children is diagnosed by having...

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Join us at eMerge 4/29/2019 for Smart Cities Competition Final Presentations

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Join us at eMerge 4/29/2019 for Smart Cities Competition Final Presentations

The University of Miami and the City of Coral Gables are hosting a competition aimed at helping the city be smarter, more sustainable, and more efficient. The next generation of cities is here. We are living in a world where many urban areas are being transformed and using more efficient and sustainable approaches. In essence, various populated areas are turning into “smarter cities” where every aspect of the city is hyper-connected through technology and other means. The City of Coral Gables is one of many cities that are working toward this goal. In an effort to ramp up its efforts, the city has partnered with the University of Miami's School of Architecture and the Center for Computational Science to host a competition that will give applicants the chance to bring their ideas to life by prototyping technology solutions that will help alleviate traffic-related challenges in the city. The Design Your Coral Gables Competition is focused on five specific sub-problems under the general domain of transportation and traffic. Applicants, from all industry backgrounds, may choose to focus their solution on one of five sub-problems the city is facing: commercial trucking, parking, environmental sustainability, public safety, and speed safety. Neil Schwam (pictured on the left at Smart Cities MIAMI 2019), who has a background in finance, economics and technology, is part of the team “Smart Day Coral Gables.” The team, comprised of four people, have come up with an idea of a unique data service that can/could help the city understand how it can better allocate city resources and services on a daily basis. “If the City knew the precise trends of how people moved through the City over the course of a day, where people were throughout the day, and was able to continuously collect and analyze this data, then the City can determine where they need to make changes,” said Schwam. Schwam and his team are in the process of creating a data service that will run on smartphones ‘behind the scenes’—taking existing location and other data from popular apps such as Instagram, in order to map and understand these trends. It’s worth noting that while harvesting such data, Schwam said identify and personal information will be kept private. They believe this will be one of several resources the city can use to help alleviate all five of the City’s defined problems. “We’ll have a better idea of when trucks should schedule deliveries. The city can also better manage parking, and even price it more efficiently because now they’ll know when parking will be in demand," said Schwam. “The data could help reduce our carbon footprint when it comes to public transportation, and it can also help the city allocate more cross walks and speed zones depending where people—particularly children—are concentrated at various times throughout the day.” Another team named “Connect” is confident they have what it takes to help the City of Coral Gables. Zhengrong Hu, a current PhD student at the University of Miami, said the team wants to bring the technology from a smartphone into the infrastructure around us. They want to do this by using real-time data. “Everybody is always on their phone. People use them all the time while walking and driving. One of our ideas is to perhaps use augmented technology to beam...

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You’re Invited to the CCS Fellows Spring Symposium 4/30/2019

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You’re Invited to the CCS Fellows Spring Symposium 4/30/2019

The vision of the Center for Computational Science’s CCS Fellows Program is to inspire a new generation of leaders in computational science to cross the traditional boundaries between disciplines, by equipping them with new cross-disciplinary skills and experience. The Program does this by offering mentorship outside the students’ area of expertise. CCS Fellow is a prestigious designation awarded to 4 students per year either from the graduate or the undergraduate programs, from any of the 11 Schools and Colleges. Join us on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, 2:30-4:30 PM at the Newman Alumni Center (Executive Conference Room) for the Fellows' concluding project presentations. This event is free and open to interested UM Faculty/Staff/Students.  Please RSVP if you plan to attend.   LOCATION Robert and Judi Prokop Newman Alumni Center, 6200 San Amaro Drive, Executive Conference Room (1st Floor), Coral Gables, FL 33146.  |  Map + Directions   Meet the Fellows Yeo Jin "Amy" Ahn Project  Automating and Accelerating the Autism Diagnostic Process Mentors Mitsunori Ogihara, PhD | Dept. of Computer Science and CCS Daniel S. Messinger, PhD  |  Professor of Psychology Amy is a PhD student in Psychology. She graduated with honors from Cornell University with a B.S. in Human Development and a concentration in Social and Personality Development. She joined the Early Play and Development Lab in fall of 2017. She is interested in infants' and young children's social interaction and how it relates to typical and atypical social and emotional development. She aims to better understand children's social behaviors by implementing objective measurement. Steven Anderson Project  Virtual Reality Simulations of Dyadic Medical Interactions Mentors Daniel S. Messinger, PhD  |  Professor of Psychology Elizabeth Reynolds Losin, PhD  |  Department of Psychology - Health Division Steven is a PhD student working under the supervision of Dr. Elizabeth Losin in the Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Division in the Department of Psychology. He received his Bachelor of Liberal Arts in Psychology from Harvard University Extension School. Prior to joining the Social and Cultural Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Miami, Steven worked on developing behavioral health interventions for patients with chronic medical conditions at a healthcare technology company. His doctoral research centers on identifying sociocultural and contextual influences on pain perception in the self and others, with an applied focus on medical settings and the doctor-patient relationship. His research utilizes behavioral, neuroimaging, psychophysiological, and computational methods. Jin Yop "Stephano" Chang Project  Development of Closed-Loop Neuromodulation of Gait and Balance Control After Spinal Cord Injury Mentors Odelia Schwartz, PhD  |  Department of Computer Science Brian R. Noga, PhD and James D. Guest, MD PhD FACS FRCS (C) | The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis Stephano is a Neurosurgery resident pursuing his PhD in Neuroscience with Dr. Brian Noga and Dr. James Guest at the University of Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, combining his clinical background with his scientific interest in neuromodulation for spinal cord injury. During the CCS Fellows program, he hopes to apply a computational approach to optimize the application of neurostimulation technologies to restore function after injury. Samantha Mitsven Project  Objective Measurement of Language Development: An Investigation of Preschoolers' Networked Social Interactions Mentors Chaoming Song, PhD | Department of Physics Daniel S. Messinger, PhD  |  Professor of Psychology Samantha received her B.A. in Psychology from San Diego State University in 2013 and worked as a Research Assistant and Lab Manager in...

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Snapshots of Data Science in Action

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Snapshots of Data Science in Action

Across the University of Miami’s three campuses, faculty and students are immersed in research aimed at providing shape and solutions to some of the world’s most pressing issues. Helping to solve some of the riddles is the use of data science, or big batches of information that are filtered through high performance computers that aid researchers in their efforts to decipher complex formulas and create predictive applications. Here’s a look at some of the ongoing work:   Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science • Professor Ben Kirtman and assistant research scientist Leo San Pedro Siquiera (pictured below) are constantly working to refine their high-resolution climate simulation, which uses large data sets. This model enables them to visualize very small features in the ocean called fronts and eddies throughout the entire world, providing unprecedented detail in their forecasts. In order to isolate climate change from naturally fluctuating weather cycles, Siquiera and Kirtman use several iterations of the same time period. This generates massive amounts of data, yet allows them to make climate change predictions and sea level change forecasts that are more precise than earlier models. From the models, Siquiera said they have found that sea levels are rising at a rate of 3 millimeters per year, and that by 2100, the world can expect a two- to six-foot increase in sea levels, depending on carbon emissions and local land elevations. Yet, their model also allows scientists to get regional details about the extent of the water level rise. “Sea level changes are uneven across different regions and can deviate substantially,” Siquiera said. “This is the frontier of climate simulation because we have access to unparalleled high-performance computational resources. There are very few other efforts worldwide that are doing these kinds of simulations.”     • Professor Claire Paris-Limouzy of the Department of Ocean Sciences focuses on dispersion in theocean. She developed a computer application called the Connectivity Modeling System to track planktonic organisms and pollutants in the ocean. To truly understand where they move, Paris-Limouzy must also use ocean circulation models. These models provide the flowing currents that disperse and transport plankton, fish larvae, and chemicals throughout the sea. Paris-Limouzy's models help isolate where eggs and larvae mature and join fish populations. The models can also further forecast changes in different environmental conditions so that the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other agencies may use the data to determine fish quotas, as well as areas of protection for marine life. Paris-Limouzy said her modeling system relies heavily on the supercomputer because it pulls information from such large, varied data sets that would take hours to process without a high-powered system. “Modeling of plankton or pollutants at sea can only be run effectively on the supercomputer,” she said. “Otherwise, it would be impossible to combine complex interactions between live particles and the ocean's currents analytically. You need a system capable of tracking millions of particles with individual behaviors from many locations in three spatial dimensions and through time.”   • Professor Villy Kourafalou, in the Department of Ocean Sciences , creates circulation models to better understand how the ocean’s currents are flowing. These high resolution models of the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Straits can offer predictions one week in advance and in extremely fine detail, which has given them an advantage above...

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The Future of Data + New Supercomputer and New Data Science Degree

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The Future of Data + New Supercomputer and New Data Science Degree

Data. Although it is a short word, often dismissed as numbers or statistics, it follows us everywhere today. From the steps that we take, to our traffic patterns and driving speeds, to identifying our genomic sequence and even our daily purchasing habits. And more each day, governments, schools, and businesses are seeing the benefits of this information. It helps cruise lines track which passengers are buying more sodas while they are on board, and then an hour later, offer discounts to those who have not ordered drinks. Hospital workers use it to monitor the number of patients they receive weekly, then can correlate it with historical data about when illnesses spike to help decide when more staff are needed. These are just a couple of examples of the power of data science. “The question is, can you use the data that exists to make better decisions on day-to-day activities or planning for the future,” said University of Miami Computer Science professor Mitsunori Ogihara (pictured below at Big Data 2018), who helps consult on projects like these as the program director for Big Data Analytics & Data Mining at UM’s Center for Computational Science (CCS). “In many cases, this data is very large.” At UM, researchers are well aware of the value that data holds to improve the future and their individual work. Professors in nearly every one of the University’s 11 schools and colleges are taking advantage of the supercomputer available through CCS to analyze large amounts of data that can bolster their research. And soon, CCS will be modernizing their supercomputer to further advance UM’s data science potential. For example, in the Miller School of Medicine, researchers like professors Vance Lemmon and John Bixby, along with Computer Science professor Zheng Wang, are using massive data sets to create models of the human genome that can shed light on how our genes control nerve regeneration. In the Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science, professor Ben Kirtman and his team use data taken from ocean sensors to create detailed climate change models that can predict how sea level rise will affect our lives in the next 20 years. In the College of Arts and Sciences, English professor Lindsay Thomas is mining the language found in at least 500,000 different articles to evaluate how people value the humanities. And in the School of Architecture, students are planning buildings and homes with data sensors to track people’s use of utilities, so consumers can be more aware of their usage. They are also looking into creating safety mechanisms, such as tiles that could alert help if an elderly person falls, said the School’s dean, Rodolphe el-Khoury. The value of this information is also driving private companies’ need for data scientists to sift through all the information. That is why professors from a variety of disciplines have joined forces to propose a new graduate degree at UM—the Master’s in Data Science, with tracks in architecture, marine science, technical (computer science) and data visualization through UM’s School of Communication. The new graduate program, which is organized by CCS and in the final stages of formal approvals, is expected to be offered this fall. In the Miami Business School, a five-year-old Master’s in Business Analytics program and a Bachelor’s of Science in Business Analytics already exists, but administrators would like to expand upon UM’s...

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The U’s Next-Generation Supercomputer will Accelerate Data & Research

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The U’s Next-Generation Supercomputer will Accelerate Data & Research

What if massive data sets could be accessed and analyzed in just an hour, instead of a day? It could change the field of genomics, help researchers predict impacts of climate change more expediently, and help create a safer campus with faster analysis of security videos. These are some of the possibilities that lay ahead when a new supercomputer is installed at the University of Miami in the near future. Custom-made for the University by IBM, the new system was assembled and programmed in California, and should arrive at UM’s downtown facility by late April-early May, said Nicholas Tsinoremas, director of the Center for Computational Science (CCS). Nick Tsinoremas“With advances in artificial intelligence and science, we wanted to overcome barriers with this new generation of supercomputer and enable more research,” Tsinoremas said. “Advances in data science and big data drove us to this new technology.” The new system, an IBM Power System, is a sibling of one of the most powerful supercomputers in the country, which is located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tsinoremas said. UM’s first supercomputer—Pegasus I—was unveiled in 2008. Then, in 2013 it was updated to add more processing and storage capacity and renamed Pegasus II. The new supercomputer represents an overhaul of previous technology, said Tsinoremas and Joel Zysman, director of advanced computing at CCS. “The past were all significant steps [for UM], but this is an exponential next phase in technological capacity,” Tsinoremas said. “It’s a revolution from traditional supercomputer technology.” Although older supercomputers were simply fast at crunching numbers (their productivity was measured in calculations per second), the new supercomputer will process data more efficiently, so that now CCS staff will be able to talk about how many terabytes they can process and analyze per second. “Everything from retrieving data, to processing data to analyzing it and presenting results is now viewed as a whole,” Zysman said. Instead of researchers having to upload files in batches to be processed, users will be able to log in to a session and interact with the data while it is being processed. In addition, the new system will enable more computer vision projects, which analyze images to draw conclusions (such as facial recognition technology). These images are often the data used for machine learning and deep learning projects, where computer algorithms are trained to make decisions like a human would, but require large data sets to “learn” from. Another major advantage: students will be able to access the super computer from their laptops, and login and start processing data independently. Currently, only about 1,500 people on UM’s three campuses utilize the supercomputer (mostly in the sciences), however with the new equipment in place and the advent of data science research among professors in the humanities, political science, law, and music, CCS expects more traffic. “We expect that more people will take advantage of these resources and we want to make it as easy as possible to do it,” Zysman said. Tsinoremas and Zysman said that UM may be the first university to acquire this type of computing technology. They said the need for it has been growing as CCS gets more and more calls from faculty and students who would like to do data science research projects. While years ago there...

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2-Day Software Carpentry-Python Workshop 3/21-22/2019 Medical Campus

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2-Day Software Carpentry-Python Workshop 3/21-22/2019 Medical Campus

Register Now | Syllabus This Bash, Python, and git workshop is capped at 35 participants, and is on a first-come/first-served basis. If you are looking to make yourself competitive in the job market If you want to take a personal project to the next level If you are interested in learning programming for data analysis Then this workshop is for you. Our trained instructors will lead you through a comprehensive, hands-on overview of an introductory data analysis using Python. We will cover topics like data types, functions, conditional statements, loops, errors and exceptions, debugging, and some key Python libraries and writing Python programs that will work like Linux command-line tools. This workshop is designed to provide a foundation of basic concepts that all programming depends on, using Python as an example. WHEN Thursday and Friday, March 21-22, 2019 8:00 AM Registration  | 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Course Hours, Both Days LOCATION + PARKING The Collaboratory is on the first floor of the Louis Calder Memorial Library (1601 NW 10th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136). The closest and easiest paid parking is available in the Jackson Hospital parking garages nearby. There are 2: one just to the north, next to the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and the other is west, next to the Rosenstiel Medical Sciences Building (RMSB). Medical Campus map | Directions The parking garages are buildings 49 (P 10 - Red Garage) and 50 (P 11- Green Garage) on the map. Calder Library is building 15 on the map. The Red Garage is closest. Daily Self-Parking Rates at Jackson Hospital Garages (from their website): Up to 2 Hours: FREE 2 to 2 ½ Hours: $5 2 ½ to 3 Hours: $7 3 to 3 ½ Hours: $9 3 ½ to 24 Hours: $11 Lost Chip Coin: $16 GREEN GARAGE Park Plaza West Street Address: 1140 N.W. 16 St. Spaces: 1897 Hours: 24/7 RED GARAGE Park Plaza East Street Address: 901 N.W. 17 St. Spaces: 1694 Hours: 24/7   NOTE: Bring your own laptop (any OS).   Brought to you by the Graduate School, the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Aging, UM Libraries, and CCS, this 2-day workshop will provide you with the basic computing skills and best practices needed to be productive in a small research team. The format is a mixture of short seminars and hands-on practical exercises, and participants are encouraged to help one another, and to try applying what they have learned to their own research problems during and between sessions.   Instructors:  Tim Norris, PhD, Research Data Scientist   &  Kalan Dawson, CCS Advanced Computing System Administrator...

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Notification to Pegasus Users: Access to /projects2 unavailable on 4/10/2019

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Notification to Pegasus Users: Access to /projects2 unavailable on 4/10/2019

Dear Pegasus Users, Please take into account, access to /projects2 will be unavailable on April 10th from 8:00 am until end of day to allow for hardware expansion of the storage system.  Jobs will continue to run, but users will have no access to /projects2 filesystems. Thank you for understanding. As always, if you have any questions or problems, please contact us by sending email to: hpc@ccs.miami.edu....

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