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Computational Science is widely recognized as a critical means to solving many of today’s most challenging problems.  The analysis and knowledge gained from working with the incredible data explosion produced by massive experiments, observations and computer generated models is leading to solutions at an unimagined pace. Data-Intensive discovery (the fourth paradigm of scientific research), and Multi Scale Interdisciplinary  approaches are becoming more prevalent in the way that Science and Engineering is generating...

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CCS Data Scholars Summer Data Immersion program funded by The Children’s Trust

Posted by on 9:13 am in Community Outreach, News | Comments Off on CCS Data Scholars Summer Data Immersion program funded by The Children’s Trust

CCS Data Scholars Summer Data Immersion program funded by The Children’s Trust

We are beyond excited to announce that the CCS Data Scholars Summer Data Immersion program has been funded by The Children’s Trust and is launching in July, 2017. The proposal was led by our partners at Educate Tomorrow, a nonprofit organization with the mission to provide a path to independence for at-risk, homeless, and foster youth, through education, mentoring, and life-skills programming. CCS will be hosting 20-25 data scholars on the Coral Gables and RSMAS campuses from July 5th to 27th, for a series of projects that allow them to explore the wide range of possible careers in computational science. The scholars will have the opportunity to develop their command-line skills while exercising their creativity through playing with geospatial, image, and text data. The program will culminate in a project that brings together the collection, analysis, and visualization of data on a particular aspect of their lives that they choose to track for a week. This final project follows in the footsteps of the Dear Data project which produced a series of analog postcards that are now a permanent exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The CCS Data Scholars program brings together experts across the UM community and beyond, including Dr Meghan Gillespie, a UM post-doctoral fellow who holds a PhD in Chemistry, Dr Robin Bachin, Assistant Provost for Civic and Community Engagement, Dr Ji Schen, faculty member at the School of Education and his student, Guanhua Chen, who is an integral part of the curriculum development team and the team that is developing program assessment methods. The UM Black Graduate Student Association and CCS’ very own Chance Scott are also providing their input in the development of the project-based curriculum. From outside UM, Claudia Gourdet, an undergraduate student who has worked with Educate Tomorrow, is making sure that we remain connected to the interests of the youth. Computational science has infiltrated almost all disciplines; computational skills have now become foundational for those who seek to be not only users but active creators of the future. The humanities, social sciences, architecture, communication and biomedical sciences have sub disciplines that rely on computational analyses to glean insights from data. The need for data scientists in various industries is palpable. The CCS Data Scholars program strengthens the University of Miami’s position in filling this need. Many initiatives attempt to develop students’ coding toolkit, but none of them put these tools in the context of how they may be used to understand how the world works. In addition, technological advances are allowing the collection of big data, but not its interpretation. Transforming data into knowledge relies on a skilled workforce. Integrating knowledge into human behavior relies on a science-literate public. The CCS Data Scholars program operates on both levels, by (a) cultivating a foundation for computational career paths, and (b) creating a scaffold for science-literacy through a focus on critical thinking and problem solving. Importantly, the program is designed to encourage youth to pursue careers in computational science; recognizing that diversity of experience and perspective are key to innovation and the advancement of science and engineering. This is further recognized by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health through their recent solicitations for grant applications. We are thrilled to welcome the CCS Data Scholars on campus on...

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Real-estate-tech-startup Gridics partners with City of Miami to ease zoning process

Posted by on 2:56 pm in News | Comments Off on Real-estate-tech-startup Gridics partners with City of Miami to ease zoning process

Real-estate-tech-startup Gridics partners with City of Miami to ease zoning process

Gridics—a Miami-based real estate tech startup—announced a partnership with the City of Miami that will use its Zonar.City software application across planning, zoning, and development functions. At its core, the proprietary software integrates all the regulations and variables of a zoning code with property records and parcels to allow users to create potential development scenarios on a 3-D map. It is designed to integrate with any city’s zoning code to allow the city to expedite development plan reviews, to conduct real-time 3D development scenarios, and to visually test proposed zoning code changes, the Company said. Gridics, founded by three University of Miami graduate students with backgrounds in urban planning, architecture, real estate tech, and engineering, announced last month that it has raised $1.1 million in seed funding. The round was led by California-based Dune Road Capital, and included Miami real estate developer Avra Jain. Last week, the company said it has partnered with Redevelopment Management Associates, a consulting and management firm specializing in revitalizing core areas and corridors for cities, counties, and special districts nationwide. RMA said it will be introducing the software at the Florida City County Managers annual conference in Orlando later this month, and is implementing the software on projects in Pompano Beach, Sunrise, and Lake Park, Florida.   [Gridics was a participant in our inaugural Smart Cities Miami Conference.] SOURCE:...

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What Happens When Google Turns Artists Loose On Its Search Data

Posted by on 10:14 am in News | Comments Off on What Happens When Google Turns Artists Loose On Its Search Data

What Happens When Google Turns Artists Loose On Its Search Data

by Meg Miller | CO.DESIGN Data journalists work at the crossroads of reportage and visual creativity. They tell stories by shaping information like journalists do, but they communicate through visceral and compelling visuals. The same can be said of data artists, who emphasize the illustrative qualities of visualization over facts and numbers—but communicate stories in much the same way. As the data journalist Alberto Cairo, who is partnering with Google News Lab on a new artist-focused initiative, puts it: “The people we are collaborating with have this dual approach. Some call themselves artists, but their approach is journalistic in the sense that they don’t try primarily to produce art as a vehicle for self-expression, but as a means to communicate ideas.” [Image: Moritz Stefaner/Google News Lab] Since 2015, Google News Lab has worked to make the company’s huge trove of Search data accessible to newsrooms. Most of the lab’s previous projects—such as the annual Year In Search that digs back through the year’s headline news, or initiatives to train journalists to incorporate data into their stories—introduce tools that make it easier to use data in news reporting. As Google News Lab data editor Simon Rogers points out, Google has access not only to a giant swath of data—but also to data that represents what people are really interested in, honestly and without agenda. Google doesn’t get its numbers by polling people or prompting them in any way; it simply pulls them from what people naturally search for. “It takes you beyond the echo chamber of social media into what the world really thinks and cares about,” says Rogers. Rogers and his team wondered what would happen if they handed over access to that data to designers and artists instead–and gave them total freedom to choose not only what to visualize, but how. In collaboration with Cairo, they turned to a different group of professionals to parse Google’s Search information: data artists. Their data visualization project, which began in December, aims to explore new ways of visualizing data through experimentation with artists and designers. The only requirements the project imposes on participants are that the work should push data journalism forward, and it should be mobile-friendly. The latter point, Rogers says, has recently become a challenge for data designers. “Data visualization has come a long way from just simple maps and charts, yet the formats we have have gotten smaller as the audience moves to mobile,” he says.   [Image: Nadieh Bremer/Google News Lab] The nine projects that have been published since the initiative’s launch range interestingly in topic, aesthetic, and approach, and they feel very different from Google News Lab’s more news-focused work. The design studio Accurat, for example, created a graphic, gradient-tinged viz for the election. Meanwhile, German data visualization specialist Moritz Stefaner dissected the patterns of food searches with a visualization called, beautifully, The Rhythm of Food. His interactive infographics are akin to what you would find at news organizations with big data design teams, like the Guardian or the New York Times—with graphs that can be explored by the user in various ways, offering multiple perspectives on one topic. The difference here is that Stefaner told the entire story using visuals, rather than simply using them to illustrate a news article. The most recent projects to come out of the initiative are a pair of stories from datasketch.es, a collaboration between data designers Nadieh Bremer and Shirley...

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Presenting the 2016-17 CCS Fellows’ Interdisciplinary Research Projects

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Presenting the 2016-17 CCS Fellows’ Interdisciplinary Research Projects

  Michael Durante   Uveal melanoma (UM) is a highly aggressive eye cancer that leads to metastatic death in up to half of patients. Despite great progress in the diagnosis and treatment of UM over recent decades, there has been no corresponding improvement in survival. Michael's project “Epigenomic Profiling of Uveal Melanoma” focuses on using next-generation sequencing techniques to understand epigenetic regulation of UM tumorigenesis.  Using techniques that interrogate the histone modifications and chromatin accessibility, Michael was able to study how the driver mutations change the epigenetic landscape of uveal melanoma. The Center for Computational Science’s Pegasus supercomputer was necessary for the analysis of this data, which required advanced mathematical modeling. The guidance he received from his CCS mentor was instrumental to his success in this project. His CCS fellowship provided him with access to important resources and experienced faculty that helped shape his PhD thesis work. His advisors are:  J. William Harbour, MD | Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and Stephan Schürer, PhD | CCS Drug Discovery Program Director     Michael Fernandez Michael Fernandez, formerly of United States Air Force (USAF) Intelligence, is working with the Aerodynamics and CFD Lab on co-flow jet airfoil vortex visualization. Current images are 2D (example at right). Michael's project is to create 3D visualizations of airfoils and turbomachinery using MATLAB. His Advisors are:  Gecheng Zha, PhD | Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and Mahsa Mirzargar, PhD | Computer Science                   Anchen Sun Adapting a shallow water equation solver for high-performance computing Anchen's project revolves around the numerical solution of the shallow water equations on high performance computers. He will focus on identifying the bottlenecks in the code’s performance, whether it in CPU-bound or memory-bandwidth bound and suggest improvements.             Nicolas Velasquez   Evolution of the Infrastructural Power of the State: Magdalena Medio, 1982-2002. Nicolas employed GIS and programming tools to (re)code information held in printed maps or raster images back into a georeferenced relational database. The goal was to profit from cartographic sources, often neglected by researchers, that hold information that might otherwise be lost digitally (i.e., old data that was kept in obsolete magnetic media) but that survives in print or image, often in choropleth or monochromatic patterned maps. Thus, the project does something like a reverse GIS, employing computational tools to navigate sheets of paper and (semi)automatically extract information from pixels, polygons, and patterns representing roads, municipalities, intensities of protests, distribution of public goods, among others. The project was designed to help him built datasets he employed in his Political Science dissertation about the relationship between State Power and Political Violence in the Magdalena Medio (Colombia). As far as they could, he and his tutor employed open source tools, especially R and Quantum GIS. His Advisors are:  Gecheng Zha, PhD | Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and Mahsa Mirzargar, PhD | Computer Science            ...

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Get free help with your project from the CCS Student Mentors

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Get free help with your project from the CCS Student Mentors

-Need help with your script? -Are you getting error messages that don’t make sense? -Do you have data and don’t know where to start? CCS Student Mentors can help! Although we understand that (especially when you are just getting started) the documentation alone may not be written in an accessible way, we encourage you to come to the CCS Students Mentors with a specific question, error message, or problem you are trying to solve. We also have a CCS Student Mentors GitHub Wiki, written by the founding Mentors, which is currently being updated. The CCS Student Mentors program is a peer mentorship program in computational science, coordinated and sponsored by CCS.  Mentors are a network of computationally advanced students, available first by email, then by appointment as needed to obtain help with specific questions regarding data and its analysis.  CCS believes that a vibrant and thriving computational community at UM can accelerate research workflows for wet labs as well as dry labs, turn data into knowledge, and open up questions that become tangible with advanced computing tools. In case you’re wondering . . . Should I learn Python or R or both?   Areas of Expertise The CCS Student Mentors Program extends its services to all Schools and Colleges at UM, and welcomes the connections between diverse sets of disciplines based on the common ground of computational tools and methods. The program currently includes mentors from computational biology and marine science, and it is our hope that it will expand into more disciplines as the computational methods employed in these fields become more commonplace.   Get in Touch Email stu-mentors@ccs.miami.edu with your questions. This will create a ticket in our system, someone will respond within a day or so. If your query is not resolved by email, and you need a meeting, we’re happy to find a time to meet with you.        ...

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Notification: CCS Resources may be Intermittently Unavailable 3/10

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Notification: CCS Resources may be Intermittently Unavailable 3/10

CCS resources may be intermittently unavailable this evening, March 10 2017, starting at 22:00. This unscheduled network downtime should be brief, and is necessary to troubleshoot issues affecting all CCS systems. We apologize for any inconveniences this may cause, and thank you for your patience....

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Apply now for a Summer Research Experience – REU: Computing for Structure

Posted by on 8:59 am in News - Archived, Research - Archived | Comments Off on Apply now for a Summer Research Experience – REU: Computing for Structure

Apply now for a Summer Research Experience – REU: Computing for Structure

The Department for Computer Science, in partnership with CCS and other UM units, is accepting applications for the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (NSF REU) summer research experience. This 10-week program runs from May 22 - July 28 and focuses on the discovery and visualization of structure in large datasets. Students in this REU program are offered: A $5,000 stipend. Housing in the residence halls of University of Miami. Food stipends of $120 per week. Travel allowance of $600. Students can familiarize themselves with the NSF REU by visiting the NSF REU Information For Students.  Applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents. Applications must be submitted via email to Dr. Burt Rosenberg at burt@cs.miami.edu.  Click here for full program details and instructions on how to apply.  ...

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Smart Cities MIAMI Conference Plans for New Future

Posted by on 2:56 pm in Events - Past, Lectures & Seminars - Archived, News - Archived, Smart Cities Events - Archived, Workshops - Archived | Comments Off on Smart Cities MIAMI Conference Plans for New Future

Smart Cities MIAMI Conference Plans for New Future

MIAMI, Fla. (February 24, 2017)—The inaugural Smart Cities Miami Conference, hosted last week by the School of Architecture and the Center for Computational Science ("CCS"), brought industry visionaries, technology experts, government planners, and the public together to focus on the “disruptive power” that the mobilization of new technology will have in our cities and on our lives. “We are at the threshold of significant transformations in the urban environment provoked by new services and practices that mobilize emerging technology,’’ Rodolphe el-Khoury, dean of the School of Architecture said in kicking off the conference held February 23 and 24 in the Miami Design District’s Moore Building. “These disruptive powers, along with more radical disruptions are sure to change the ways we imagine, shape, inhabit, use, enjoy, manage, and govern the urban realm.” Added Nick Tsinoremas, director of the Center for Computational Science (CCS), “We live in unprecedented times where technology transforms the way we live and interact with the city. This conference is our first attempt to bring together all the stakeholders—government, industry, academic institutions, and the public—to engage in discussions to understand and shape these transformational forces.” The forum for cutting-edge research and interdisciplinary perspectives was designed to connect UM and the larger community of entrepreneurs and innovators who are rapidly reinventing Miami as an incubator for tech start-ups with the development and planning agencies in the public and private sectors who are guiding the evolution of one of the fastest-growing cities in North America. The keynote speaker, Antoine Picon, the director of research at Harvard Graduate School of Design and an expert on the Smart City phenomenon, talked extensively about the changes brought to cities and architecture by digital tools and digital culture as well as the need for technology to embrace sociocultural issues. He emphasized that the city of the future will combine human with artificial intelligence and that from this, a new awareness will arise. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, Joel Zysman, CCS’s director of Advanced Computing, and Jean-Pierre Bardet, dean of the College of Engineering, led discussions about transformation through datafication, environmentally sustainable technologies, innovation, artificial intelligence, and the best uses of technology solutions. The School of Architecture’s RAD-UM Lab and several technology companies also shared their demos and start-up innovations, showcasing mixed-use building blocks for a smart city environment.  (Exhibitors included:  Woosh Water, The Underline, Blackdove Art Gallery, the Miami Affordability Project ("MAP"), TesserRx, Gridics, Zenciti Yucatán, UM CCS Software Engineering, and Code for Miami.) During the second day of the conference, a Zenciti Workshop, a multidisciplinary team led by Dean el-Khoury examined and discussed a project for a smart city, designed from the ground up on a site in Mexico’s Yucatan, just outside Merida. Zenciti will illustrate a customized city on a unified platform, serving as a prototype of the future. As Picon suggested, every city, even if not yet identified as a “smart city,” needs a plan.   [gmedia id=38] The conference was made possible with the support of contributing sponsors Zenciti, Miami Design District, DDN Storage, and Intel.                                   ...

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“Diversifying Amazon Recommendations” Pizza Seminar Series Friday 2/17/17

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“Diversifying Amazon Recommendations” Pizza Seminar Series Friday 2/17/17

Dr. Houssam Nassif, machine learning scientist from amazon.com, will be presenting two recently published papers: 1) Diversifying Music Recommendations (ICML'16 Workshop) uses submodular diversity to significantly improve Prime Music App recommendations quality and user engagement. 2) Adaptive, Personalized Diversity for Visual Discovery (RecSys'16 Best Short Paper Award) describes Amazon Stream's seasonal, personalized and diversified recommendation framework. Amazon Stream (http://www.amazon.com/stream/), a new website for fashion discovery, uses Bayesian regression to score products, balances exploration and exploitation, applies submodularity to diversify recommendations, and learns seasonal and personalized weights to produce the final recommended personalized stream.   Open to UM Faculty/Staff/Students, this is a special edition of the Pizza Seminar Series to be held on Friday 2/17/17, 2:30-3:30 PM, in the Cox Science Building, Room 42, 1301 Memorial Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146.   This seminar is jointly sponsored by the Department of Computer Science, Neuroscience, and the Center for Computational Science.  No RSVP required....

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Inaugural SMART CITIES MIAMI Conference February 23 & 24

Posted by on 11:37 am in Events - Past, Lectures & Seminars - Archived, News - Archived, Smart Cities Events - Archived | Comments Off on Inaugural SMART CITIES MIAMI Conference February 23 & 24

Inaugural SMART CITIES MIAMI Conference February 23 & 24

  The University of Miami brings cutting-edge research in urban planning, architecture, and engineering—in alignment with computational resources and analytical expertise—to aid in the design and development of more sustainable, livable, and resilient cities. This conference gathers leaders in academia, professional practice, and industry to examine the Smart Cities phenomenon in relation to emerging trends and technology. The focus is on infrastructure and the built environment, as well as new potentials for business and governance. Join us on Thursday, February 23rd, for a keynote talk by Dr. Antoine Picon (Harvard University Graduate School of Design), panel discussions, and networking. #smartcitiesmiamiconference This Conference is jointly organized by the Center for Computational Science and the School of Architecture, and will be hosted in the Miami Design District at the Moore Building, 191 NE 40th Street, Miami, FL 33137. Parking:  Valet parking is available.   Day 1 - February 23   1:00 PM Welcome Address Panel Discussions Technology and the City Datafication and the City New Services and Experiences 5:30 PM Keynote Speaker   Day 2 - February 24   (Participation is by invitation only.) 8:30 AM-2:00 PM   Zenciti Workshop : Designing a smart city in Yucatán Zenciti is a project for a smart city in Yucatan designed from the ground up by an multi-disciplinary team based at the University of Miami. The workshop introduces the project for the first time to experts, entrepreneurs, and potential industry partners for input in the implementation process. $30.00 USD  | Download Flyer | Conference Program   Please click here to apply for a demo station at the Smart Cities Miami Conference Day 1.   Keynote Speaker Antoine Picon, Director of Research, Harvard Graduate School of Design   Dr. Picon is the G. Ware Travelstead Professor of the History of Architecture and Technology and Director of Research at the GSD. He teaches courses in the history and theory of architecture and technology. He is also Director of Research at the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in Paris. Trained as an engineer, architect, and historian, Dr. Picon works on the history of architectural and urban technologies from the eighteenth century to the present. He has published extensively on this subject. His three most recent books are dealing extensively with the changes brought to cities and architecture by the development of digital tools and digital culture. Digital Culture in Architecture: An Introduction for the Design Profession (2010) offers a comprehensive overview of this important transition. Ornament: The Politics of Architecture and Subjectivity (2013) focuses on the "return" of ornament in digital architecture to further the investigation. Finally, Smart Cities: A Spatialised Intelligence (2015) discusses its impact on cities. Dr. Picon has received a number of awards for his writings, including the Médaille de la Ville de Paris and twice the Prix du Livre d'Architecture de la Ville de Briey, a well as the Georges Sarton Medal of the University of Gand. In 2010, he was elected a member of the French Académie des Technologies, and in 2015 an associate member of the French Académie d'Architecture. Datafication and the City PANEL The Datafication and the City discussion panel will examine the transformative power that data have to help make informed decisions when designing city environments, allocating resources, attracting investments, and engaging with the public.   Jean-Pierre Bardet, PhD |  Dean, UM College of Engineering  |  Data &...

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