News & Events



HOME  orange arrow  News & Events

Posted by on 8:06 pm in Welcome | Comments Off on

Computational Science is widely recognized as a critical means to solving many of today’s most challenging problems.  The analysis and knowledge gained from working with the incredible data explosion produced by massive experiments, observations and computer generated models is leading to solutions at an unimagined pace. Data-Intensive discovery (the fourth paradigm of scientific research), and Multi Scale Interdisciplinary  approaches are becoming more prevalent in the way that Science and Engineering is generating...

read more

Notification: Advanced Computing Resources unavailable starting 8/3/17

Posted by on 8:53 am in News | Comments Off on Notification: Advanced Computing Resources unavailable starting 8/3/17

Notification: Advanced Computing Resources unavailable starting 8/3/17

Details and updates about CCS migration will be posted on the CCS AC website (http://ccs.miami.edu/ac/migration). Reminder:  CCS resources will be unavailable starting August 3, 2017 at 20:00 for the University of Miami's data center migration at the NAP of the Americas secure downtown facility. All CCS systems and networks will be affected. The migration will occur in phases, and is scheduled to complete in 2 weeks. Details and updates about CCS migration phases will be posted next week on the CCS AC website (http://ccs.miami.edu/ac/migration). Please plan your work accordingly, and thank you for your patience.   CCS AC...

read more

Dean el-Khoury’s firm Khoury Levit Fong honored by Chicago Architecture Biennial

Posted by on 10:05 am in News | Comments Off on Dean el-Khoury’s firm Khoury Levit Fong honored by Chicago Architecture Biennial

Dean el-Khoury’s firm Khoury Levit Fong honored by Chicago Architecture Biennial

Congratulations to CCS Smart Cities Program Director, and Dean of the School of Architecture, Rodolphe el-Khoury. He and his partners at Khoury Levit Fong aka "KLF", Robert Levit and Steven Fong, were selected as Official Participants at the upcoming 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial (CAB). Incidentally, KLF is the only firm from Canada to receive this distinction. The Biennial, which recognizes outstanding work in the field, is the “main stage” of contemporary architecture, unveiling avant-garde ideas, materials, technologies, and practices. It is where architects connect, collaborate, and engage the public while examining disciplinary issues and global concerns. The first architecture Biennial, took place in Venice in 1980. Twenty-five years after Venice, China launched the Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism/Architecture in 2005 in Shenzhen and Hong Kong. Chicago is the third city in the world to host an Architecture Biennial that upholds the structure, programming, and international representation of the original Venice Biennale. CAB’s 2017 theme, “Make New History” will focus on the relationship between art and architecture, history, and modernity, with the curatorial guidance of Los Angeles-based architects Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee of Johnston Marklee. In 2015, more than 530,000 Chicago residents and visitors took part in CAB. It was the largest international exhibition of contemporary architecture ever held in North America, and featured the ideas of more than 100 architecture and design firms from 30 + countries. Based on the diverse selection of firms by CAB’s new artistic leadership team, the second edition is poised to build on the success of the first. The magnificent Chicago Cultural Center, operated by Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, will once again serve as the anchor of the exhibition, with additional sites across the city. Just like with Art Basel in Miami Beach, a collection of independent architecture-themed exhibits is coordinated with the main event. Through its constellation of exhibitions, full-scale installations, programming, and related events, the Chicago Architecture Biennial invites the public to engage with and think about architecture in new ways, in a global discussion on the future of the field.
 It will take place from September 16, 2017, to January 7, 2018.   For more info on KLF, go to: www.khourylevitfong.com and for the Chicago Architecture Biennial, go to: chicagoarchitecturebiennial.org.     _______________________________________________________________ COURTESY: Chicago Architecture Biennial 2017 website  |  SOURCE: eVeritas July 24,...

read more

The Washington Post quotes Alberto Cairo on the effective use of images

Posted by on 9:44 am in News - Archived | Comments Off on The Washington Post quotes Alberto Cairo on the effective use of images

The Washington Post quotes Alberto Cairo on the effective use of images

In the article "Some of the newest cookbooks look like comics. But does that work for readers?" that appears in The Washington Post's Food Section, July 11, 2017, author Charlotte Druckman quotes CCS Visualization Program Director Albert Cairo, PhD. The article mentions Samin Nosrat's heavily illustrated debut cookbook “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat”, released in April. Tracing the history of graphic cookbooks back to the first in 1965, they were sporadically produced until recent examples. The article examines how illustrations are used as they related to the instructions. Experts on usability were consulted:  Steven Franconeri, Professor of Cognitive Psychology and Principal Investigator of Northwestern University's Visual Thinking Lab; Scott McCloud, cartoonist and author; Cecilia Hae-Jin Lee, a former graphic designer, cookbook author, and restauranteur (of "Nabi", a Korean restaurant in L.A.); and UM's Alberto Cairo, PhD, Professor of Visual Journalism, and Program Director of Visualization here at CCS.  Some actual home cooks were also consulted, agreeing with Dr. Cairo's assessment! To find out Dr. Cairo's take on the effectiveness of the use of images in cookbooks, read the full—and heavily illustrated—article at its source:   "Some of the newest cookbooks look like comics. But does that work for...

read more

Big Data Workshop: “Intro to Hadoop and Spark” at RSMAS 8/11/2017

Posted by on 8:31 am in Events - Past, News - Archived, Workshops - Archived | Comments Off on Big Data Workshop: “Intro to Hadoop and Spark” at RSMAS 8/11/2017

Big Data Workshop: “Intro to Hadoop and Spark” at RSMAS 8/11/2017

PLEASE NOTE LOCATION CHANGE:  Event will be hosted in  MSC 123 Join us for an introductory workshop on Big Data "Intro. to Hadoop and Spark" on Friday, August 11, 2017, from 1:00-4:00 PM at RSMAS, Marine Science Center MSC 123.  The workshop explores the differences between Big Data systems and traditional high-performance computing and will get your hands wet by running some Hadoop and spark jobs using sample data.  This is an excellent opportunity to grow your projects by making use of CCS’ Bigfoot cluster, and will develop skills that are indispensable for industry careers. BRING A LAPTOP. This workshop is free and open to UM Faculty, Staff, and Students.  Refreshments will be provided. This session is full.         Instructor  Zongjun Hu, PhD Lead, Big Data | CCS Advanced Computing        ...

read more

“Big Data in Health” Conference 2017 held in Italy

Posted by on 3:44 pm in Events - Past, News - Archived | Comments Off on “Big Data in Health” Conference 2017 held in Italy

“Big Data in Health” Conference 2017 held in Italy

The "Big Data in Health" Conference was held at the Villa Umbra, in Pila (Perugia, Italy), June 29-30, 2017. The event was sponsored by the University of Perugia and the University of Salerno, and organized by Enrico Capobianco (CCS Computational Biology & Bioinformatics program, University of Miami, FL-US), Luca Pieroni and Luca Salmasi (Department of Economics, University of Perugia, Italy), Liliana Minelli (Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy), Sergio Pagano and Pierpaolo Cavallo (Departments of Physics and Department of Medicine, University of Salerno, Italy). About 60 people registered and participated to the 5 sessions in the program. The audience was a mix of clinicians, academicians, researchers in industry, health administrative sector-, and other health professionals, thus confirming the spirit of the initiative aimed to propose an integrative multidisciplinary approach to Big Data in Health, particularly from the Electronic Health Records perspective. The first session was dedicated to Institutional contributions, in particular Regione Umbria (which co-sponsored the meeting), and the GARR Director Dr Federico Ruggieri (who illustrated the infrastructure needed for the management of Big Data in large projects). Three other sessions followed with contributions from academics and research, and including four young scholars who presented the results of their studies (PhD theses and postdoc projects). Finally, a well-participated panel session concluded the meeting. The main established principle characterizing the workshop was fully reflected by the fact that knowledge is dependent not just on the quantity of available Big Data, but on their connectivity. It is therefore the network between people and ideas underlying the generation, analysis, and validation of such data that creates the premises for fruitful synergies. Consequently, integrative methods can be designed to infer about the correlative and causative relationships between the complex health- and disease-related variables. Note that often Big Data do not directly reveal associations and dependencies, thus they need to be processed by sophisticated computational approaches. One emerging aspect is the fact that the integrability between clinical and administrative data in support to both research and clinical decision making is destined to play a crucial role. Once this is reached, interoperability and actionability are required steps. These two main data types are generated in response to different questions, first of all, which explains some current bottlenecks. Examples were brought to the general attention, involving diagnostic imaging in cancer, pharmacosurveillance, omics and microbiomics, among others. Finally, interesting applications were presented in the fields of cardiology, nephrology, aging, among others, and, interestingly, appeared the relevance of concepts like “inflammaging”, “immunobiography”, and “digital...

read more

CCS Data Scholars Summer Data Immersion program 7/5-27

Posted by on 9:13 am in Community Outreach, News - Archived | Comments Off on CCS Data Scholars Summer Data Immersion program 7/5-27

CCS Data Scholars Summer Data Immersion program 7/5-27

We are beyond excited to announce that the CCS Data Scholars Summer Data Immersion program has been funded by The Children’s Trust and is launching on July 5, 2017. The proposal was led by our partners at Educate Tomorrow, a nonprofit organization with the mission to provide a path to independence for at-risk, homeless, and foster youth, through education, mentoring, and life-skills programming. CCS will be hosting 20-25 data scholars on the Coral Gables and RSMAS campuses from July 5th to 27th, for a series of projects that allow them to explore the wide range of possible careers in computational science. The scholars will have the opportunity to develop their command-line skills while exercising their creativity through playing with geospatial, image, and text data. The program will culminate in a project that brings together the collection, analysis, and visualization of data on a particular aspect of their lives that they choose to track for a week. This final project follows in the footsteps of the Dear Data project which produced a series of analog postcards that are now a permanent exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The CCS Data Scholars program brings together experts across the UM community and beyond, including Dr. Meghan Gillespie, a UM post-doctoral fellow who holds a PhD in Chemistry, Dr. Robin Bachin, Assistant Provost for Civic and Community Engagement, Dr. Ji Schen, faculty member at the School of Education and his student, Guanhua Chen, who is an integral part of the curriculum development team and the team that is developing program assessment methods. The UM Black Graduate Student Association and CCS’ very own Chance Scott are also providing their input in the development of the project-based curriculum. From outside UM, Claudia Gourdet, an undergraduate student who has worked with Educate Tomorrow, is making sure that we remain connected to the interests of the youth. Computational science has infiltrated almost all disciplines; computational skills have now become foundational for those who seek to be not only users but active creators of the future. The humanities, social sciences, architecture, communication and biomedical sciences have sub disciplines that rely on computational analyses to glean insights from data. The need for data scientists in various industries is palpable. The CCS Data Scholars program strengthens the University of Miami’s position in filling this need. Many initiatives attempt to develop students’ coding toolkit, but none of them put these tools in the context of how they may be used to understand how the world works. In addition, technological advances are allowing the collection of big data, but not its interpretation. Transforming data into knowledge relies on a skilled workforce. Integrating knowledge into human behavior relies on a science-literate public. The CCS Data Scholars program operates on both levels, by (a) cultivating a foundation for computational career paths, and (b) creating a scaffold for science-literacy through a focus on critical thinking and problem solving. Importantly, the program is designed to encourage youth to pursue careers in computational science; recognizing that diversity of experience and perspective are key to innovation and the advancement of science and engineering. This is further recognized by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health through their recent solicitations for grant applications. We are thrilled to welcome the CCS Data Scholars on campus...

read more

CCS and Fastrack Institute to introduce innovative hemispheric solutions

Posted by on 10:33 am in News | Comments Off on CCS and Fastrack Institute to introduce innovative hemispheric solutions

CCS and Fastrack Institute to introduce innovative hemispheric solutions

CCS and the Fastrack Institute have signed a memorandum of understanding to concentrate on initiatives aimed to accelerate the adoption and implementation of exponential technologies with the potential to improve quality of life by delivering innovation and fostering economic competitiveness and sustainability in Latin America and the Caribbean. It will focus on big data research and analytics in the areas of smart cities, mobility, transformational healthcare technologies, education, energy, and the environment. "We are excited to form this strategic alliance with the Fastrack Institute. This relationship will help foster collaboration with public and private sectors to bring forward new, innovative solutions to address pressing problems," said CCS Center Director Nick Tsinoremas. “UM CCS and the Fastrack Institute will play a key role as part of the CCS for the Americas—the virtual platform—which brings together academia and research agencies to focus on big data research and analytics in the areas of smart cities, mobility, transformational healthcare technologies, education, energy, and the environment,” added Tsinoremas. Salim Ismael and Dr. Maurice R. Ferré, co-founders of Fastrack Institute, welcome the forward-thinking union, and discussed the impact of the multifaceted approach to global problem solving. “I am thrilled about this relationship, one that will help us advocate a mindset change into an exponential way of thinking for the entire region. The University of Miami’s vocation as a hemispheric institution provides the right venue for us to reach out to societies in the Americas with tools and infrastructure of incredible breadth and scope,” said Ismael. “The ability to work with the University of Miami’s Center for Computational Science on matters related to big data analytics on health-related issues for the hemisphere is a unique opportunity for us. Innovations In technology in biotech and genetics combined with massive computational capacity for analysis comes at the center of our objectives. We rejoice and welcome this alliance,” said Ferré. To expand upon the reach of the partnership, Fastrack’s CEO and co-founder, Rodrigo Arboleda, spoke about the significance of working with researchers and experts from across the University. “As an architect and as former head of several non-profit entities, the importance of being able to use exponential technologies and tools such as the ones available at the Center for Computational Science, is of monumental importance. With the University of Miami School of Architecture—as part of CCS's Smart Cities Program —we have a golden opportunity of finding solutions to cities’ dilemmas, using big data analytics and other new tools in fields like mobility and of urban planning and design,” said Arboleda.   (Pictured L-R: Rodrigo Arboleda, CEO and Co-Founder of Fastrack Institute; Nicholas Tsinoremas, PhD, CCS Center Director; Alejandra Collarte, Director of International Relations, UM Advancement; Ismail Salim, Co-Founder of Fastrack Institute; and Dr. Maurice R. Ferré Co-Founder Fastrack Institute.)   SOURCE: UM News & Events  | See Also:  South Florida Business Journal...

read more

Real-estate-tech-startup Gridics partners with City of Miami to ease zoning process

Posted by on 2:56 pm in News - Archived | Comments Off on Real-estate-tech-startup Gridics partners with City of Miami to ease zoning process

Real-estate-tech-startup Gridics partners with City of Miami to ease zoning process

Gridics—a Miami-based real estate tech startup—announced a partnership with the City of Miami that will use its Zonar.City software application across planning, zoning, and development functions. At its core, the proprietary software integrates all the regulations and variables of a zoning code with property records and parcels to allow users to create potential development scenarios on a 3-D map. It is designed to integrate with any city’s zoning code to allow the city to expedite development plan reviews, to conduct real-time 3D development scenarios, and to visually test proposed zoning code changes, the Company said. Gridics, founded by three University of Miami graduate students with backgrounds in urban planning, architecture, real estate tech, and engineering, announced last month that it has raised $1.1 million in seed funding. The round was led by California-based Dune Road Capital, and included Miami real estate developer Avra Jain. Last week, the company said it has partnered with Redevelopment Management Associates, a consulting and management firm specializing in revitalizing core areas and corridors for cities, counties, and special districts nationwide. RMA said it will be introducing the software at the Florida City County Managers annual conference in Orlando later this month, and is implementing the software on projects in Pompano Beach, Sunrise, and Lake Park, Florida.   [Gridics was a participant in our inaugural Smart Cities Miami Conference.] SOURCE:...

read more

What Happens When Google Turns Artists Loose On Its Search Data

Posted by on 10:14 am in News - Archived | Comments Off on What Happens When Google Turns Artists Loose On Its Search Data

What Happens When Google Turns Artists Loose On Its Search Data

by Meg Miller | CO.DESIGN Data journalists work at the crossroads of reportage and visual creativity. They tell stories by shaping information like journalists do, but they communicate through visceral and compelling visuals. The same can be said of data artists, who emphasize the illustrative qualities of visualization over facts and numbers—but communicate stories in much the same way. As the data journalist Alberto Cairo, who is partnering with Google News Lab on a new artist-focused initiative, puts it: “The people we are collaborating with have this dual approach. Some call themselves artists, but their approach is journalistic in the sense that they don’t try primarily to produce art as a vehicle for self-expression, but as a means to communicate ideas.” [Image: Moritz Stefaner/Google News Lab] Since 2015, Google News Lab has worked to make the company’s huge trove of Search data accessible to newsrooms. Most of the lab’s previous projects—such as the annual Year In Search that digs back through the year’s headline news, or initiatives to train journalists to incorporate data into their stories—introduce tools that make it easier to use data in news reporting. As Google News Lab data editor Simon Rogers points out, Google has access not only to a giant swath of data—but also to data that represents what people are really interested in, honestly and without agenda. Google doesn’t get its numbers by polling people or prompting them in any way; it simply pulls them from what people naturally search for. “It takes you beyond the echo chamber of social media into what the world really thinks and cares about,” says Rogers. Rogers and his team wondered what would happen if they handed over access to that data to designers and artists instead–and gave them total freedom to choose not only what to visualize, but how. In collaboration with Cairo, they turned to a different group of professionals to parse Google’s Search information: data artists. Their data visualization project, which began in December, aims to explore new ways of visualizing data through experimentation with artists and designers. The only requirements the project imposes on participants are that the work should push data journalism forward, and it should be mobile-friendly. The latter point, Rogers says, has recently become a challenge for data designers. “Data visualization has come a long way from just simple maps and charts, yet the formats we have have gotten smaller as the audience moves to mobile,” he says.   [Image: Nadieh Bremer/Google News Lab] The nine projects that have been published since the initiative’s launch range interestingly in topic, aesthetic, and approach, and they feel very different from Google News Lab’s more news-focused work. The design studio Accurat, for example, created a graphic, gradient-tinged viz for the election. Meanwhile, German data visualization specialist Moritz Stefaner dissected the patterns of food searches with a visualization called, beautifully, The Rhythm of Food. His interactive infographics are akin to what you would find at news organizations with big data design teams, like the Guardian or the New York Times—with graphs that can be explored by the user in various ways, offering multiple perspectives on one topic. The difference here is that Stefaner told the entire story using visuals, rather than simply using them to illustrate a news article. The most recent projects to come out of the initiative are a pair of stories from datasketch.es, a collaboration between data designers Nadieh Bremer and Shirley...

read more

Presenting the 2016-17 CCS Fellows’ Interdisciplinary Research Projects

Posted by on 9:02 am in News - Archived | Comments Off on Presenting the 2016-17 CCS Fellows’ Interdisciplinary Research Projects

Presenting the 2016-17 CCS Fellows’ Interdisciplinary Research Projects

  Michael Durante   Uveal melanoma (UM) is a highly aggressive eye cancer that leads to metastatic death in up to half of patients. Despite great progress in the diagnosis and treatment of UM over recent decades, there has been no corresponding improvement in survival. Michael's project “Epigenomic Profiling of Uveal Melanoma” focuses on using next-generation sequencing techniques to understand epigenetic regulation of UM tumorigenesis.  Using techniques that interrogate the histone modifications and chromatin accessibility, Michael was able to study how the driver mutations change the epigenetic landscape of uveal melanoma. The Center for Computational Science’s Pegasus supercomputer was necessary for the analysis of this data, which required advanced mathematical modeling. The guidance he received from his CCS mentor was instrumental to his success in this project. His CCS fellowship provided him with access to important resources and experienced faculty that helped shape his PhD thesis work. His advisors are:  J. William Harbour, MD | Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and Stephan Schürer, PhD | CCS Drug Discovery Program Director     Michael Fernandez Michael Fernandez, formerly of United States Air Force (USAF) Intelligence, is working with the Aerodynamics and CFD Lab on co-flow jet airfoil vortex visualization. Current images are 2D (example at right). Michael's project is to create 3D visualizations of airfoils and turbomachinery using MATLAB. His Advisors are:  Gecheng Zha, PhD | Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and Mahsa Mirzargar, PhD | Computer Science                   Anchen Sun Adapting a shallow water equation solver for high-performance computing Anchen's project revolves around the numerical solution of the shallow water equations on high performance computers. He will focus on identifying the bottlenecks in the code’s performance, whether it in CPU-bound or memory-bandwidth bound and suggest improvements.             Nicolas Velasquez   Evolution of the Infrastructural Power of the State: Magdalena Medio, 1982-2002. Nicolas employed GIS and programming tools to (re)code information held in printed maps or raster images back into a georeferenced relational database. The goal was to profit from cartographic sources, often neglected by researchers, that hold information that might otherwise be lost digitally (i.e., old data that was kept in obsolete magnetic media) but that survives in print or image, often in choropleth or monochromatic patterned maps. Thus, the project does something like a reverse GIS, employing computational tools to navigate sheets of paper and (semi)automatically extract information from pixels, polygons, and patterns representing roads, municipalities, intensities of protests, distribution of public goods, among others. The project was designed to help him built datasets he employed in his Political Science dissertation about the relationship between State Power and Political Violence in the Magdalena Medio (Colombia). As far as they could, he and his tutor employed open source tools, especially R and Quantum GIS. His Advisors are:  Gecheng Zha, PhD | Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and Mahsa Mirzargar, PhD | Computer Science            ...

read more
CCS
Skip to toolbar