CCS Fellows Symposium features Molecular Animations



The second annual CCS Fellows Symposium took place on Friday, April 17, 2015, and opened with a presentation by Janet Iwasa, PhD, from University of Utah’s Dept. of Biochemistry.

Janet Iwasa viral animation HIV

Dr. Iwasa emphasized that 2- or 3-dimensional drawings cannot compare to animating the process of cell behavior as a vehicle to further understanding. Ms. Iwasa showed various animations she had created “to illustrate a lot of things that are not ‘experimentally verified.” She showed her animation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (coated vesicle in real time), and said that size of the proteins plays a big factor, as well as the speed in which they work, and crowded environment of the cell — things never seen in real time. Dr. Iwasa’s latest work is an animation of the HIV cell (plus its size compared to ‘normal’ cell and how it enters a cell). These vimeo videos are on a project specific website scienceofhiv.org which was also shared at Dr. Iwasa’s 2014 TED Talk “How animations can help scientists test a hypothesis”:

The CCS Fellows Symposium heard how Dr. Iwasa was inspired to create molecular animation videos, and the type of information she is given by scientists in order to try to understand what needs to be created. She explained that molecular animation often requires her to just listen and work off of someone’s idea of how something works. Wanting to share this ability with other scientists and students, but constrained by the degree of difficulty and time involved in studying 3D animation software as she did (like Maya, Blender, and Cinema 4D, as well as plug-ins like BioBlender, Molecular Maya, and RMV), Dr. Iwasa came up with an idea for a user-friendly software called “Molecular Flipbook” (MF) which has a 10 minute to 1 hour learning curve, and is a great teaching tool.

Nicholas Tsinoremas, Lyssa Goldberg, Chun Wu, Katherine Dale, Sawsan Khuri, CCS Fellows

Pictured L-R: CCS Center Director Nicholas Tsinoremas with CCS Fellows: Lyssa Goldberg, Chun Wu (graduate level), and Katherine Dale, and CCS Director of Engagement Sawsan Khuri.

Dr. Iwasa’s stellar talk was followed by presentations from our 2014-15 CCS Fellows, who outlined the results of their projects, and highlighted how much they had learned from the experience of being CCS Fellows this academic year. Presenting were our two undergraduate Fellows, Lyssa Goldberg and Katherine Dale, and only one of our graduate Fellows, Chun Wu, because the second, Matthew Field, was presenting at a national cancer conference this week!

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